note Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “note” in the English Dictionary

"note" in British English

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notenoun

uk   /nəʊt/  us   /noʊt/

note noun (WRITING)

A1 [C] a ​shortpiece of writing: He ​left a note to say he would be ​home late. There's a note on the ​door saying when the ​shop will ​open again.B2 [C] a ​shortexplanation or an ​extrapiece of ​information that is given at the ​bottom of a ​page, at the back of a ​book, etc.: For more ​informationsee Note 3.
See also
notes A2 [plural]
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information written on ​paper: The ​windblew my notes all over the ​room. The ​reporter took notes ​throughout the ​interview.
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note noun (SOUND)

C2 [C] a ​singlesound at a ​particularlevel, usually in ​music, or a written ​symbol that ​represents this ​sound: high/​low notes She ​played three ​long notes on the ​piano. The ​enginenoisesuddenly changedits note and ​rose to a ​whine.
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note noun (WAY OF EXPRESSING)

C1 [S] an ​emotion or a way of ​expressing something: There was a note ofcaution in her ​letter. His ​speech struck just the ​right note. The ​meetingended on an ​optimistic note.

note noun (MONEY)

B1 [C] UK (US bill) a ​piece of ​papermoney: a €20 note He took a ​wad of notes from his ​pocket.

note noun (IMPORTANCE)

C2 [U] formal importance, or the ​fact that something ​deservesattention: There was nothing of note in the ​latestreport.

noteverb [T]

uk   /nəʊt/  us   /noʊt/ formal
B1 to ​notice something: They noted the ​consumers' ​growingdemand for ​quickerservice. [+ (that)] Please note (that) we will be ​closed on ​Saturday. [+ question word] Note howeasy it is to ​release the ​catchquickly. to give ​yourattention to something by ​discussing it or making a written ​record of it: [+ that] He said the ​weather was beyond ​ourcontrol, noting that last ​summer was one of the ​hottest on ​record. In the ​article, she notes several ​cases of ​medicalincompetence.
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Phrasal verbs
(Definition of note from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"note" in American English

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notenoun

 us   /noʊt/

note noun (WRITING)

[C] a ​shortpiece of writing: a ​handwritten note Make a note to ​phone him (= Write it down so you ​remember). [C] A note is a ​piece of ​information that you write down while something is ​happening: [C usually pl] Be ​sure to take notes in ​class (= write down ​information).

note noun (SOUND)

[C] a ​singlesound, esp. in ​music, or a written ​symbol which ​represents this ​sound: Her ​sopranovoiceintoned the ​low, first notes of the ​song. [C] fig. Note also ​means the ​particularquality of an ​emotion or ​feeling: The ​meetingended on an ​optimistic note.

note noun (IMPORTANCE)

[U] importance or ​fame: There was nothing of note in the ​report.

noteverb [T]

 us   /noʊt/

note verb [T] (NOTICE)

to take ​notice of, give ​attention to, or make a ​record of something: [+ that clause] Please note that we will be ​closed on ​Saturday.
noted
adjective  us   /ˈnoʊ·t̬ɪd/
a noted ​scholar
(Definition of note from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"note" in Business English

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notenoun

uk   us   /nəʊt/
[C] ( US usually bill) MONEY a ​piece of ​papermoney: a €500 notein notes He gave me £100 in £10 notes. I had no ​change; I only had notes. Can you ​change a €20 note?
[C] FINANCE a written ​agreement that one ​person, ​organization, etc. will ​pay a particular ​amount of ​money to another ​person, etc. by a particular ​date: The note for your ​loan comes ​due on 1 June. a two-year note
[C] COMMUNICATIONS a ​shortletter, or something that you write down in ​order to remember something: send/write sb a note I'll ​send you a note about this but please do put it on your ​calendars.note to sb The ​bank said in a note to ​investors that the ​operation would make ​strategic sense. I got a note from the ​CEO congratulating me on the ​deal. I made a note to ​review the matter in a month's ​time.
[C] a ​shortofficialdocument: They can get out of the ​requirement with a note from their ​doctorconfirming their diagnosis. Please ​check the ​goods before ​signing the ​delivery note.
notes [plural] detailed ​information that you write down: take notes In any ​disciplinarymeeting, it is always advisable to take notes.make notes I read through the notes I'd made at the ​conference. The ​keynote speaker gave his lecture without notes.

noteverb [T]

uk   us   /nəʊt/
to ​notice or ​realize something: They noted the ​consumers' ​growingdemand for quicker ​service.note (that) Please note that we will be ​closed on Saturday.
to mention something so that ​people are aware of it: In her ​report, she notes several ​cases of ​poorpractice on the ​part of ​management.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of note from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“note” in Business English

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