novelty Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “novelty” in the English Dictionary

"novelty" in British English

See all translations

noveltynoun

uk   /ˈnɒv.əl.ti/  us   /ˈnɑː.vəl.t̬i/
C2 [U] the quality of being new and unusual: The novelty of these toys soon wore off and the children became bored with them. In Britain in the 1950s, television still had novelty value.
C2 [C] something that has not been experienced before and so is interesting: Tourists are still a novelty on this remote island.
[C] a cheap unusual object such as a small toy, often given as a present: The shop sells gifts and other novelties. A Christmas cracker usually contains a paper hat, a joke, and a novelty. a novelty item
(Definition of novelty from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"novelty" in American English

See all translations

noveltynoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈnɑv·əl·ti/
the quality of being new or unusual, or a new or unusual experience: [U] The novelty of the toys soon wore off.
(Definition of novelty from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"novelty" in Business English

See all translations

noveltynoun

uk   us   /ˈnɒvəlti/
[U] the quality of being new and unusual: Sales of the new game are very high, but they will start to drop as the novelty wears off.
[C] something that is new and unusual: Flexible schedules, once a novelty, are now more commonplace.
[C] a cheap unusual object such as a small toy, often given as a present: We sell toys, glassware, handicrafts, table decorations, and novelties at moderate prices.
(Definition of novelty from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of novelty?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“novelty” in Business English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

Read More 

Word of the Day

shade

to prevent direct light from shining on something

Word of the Day

convo noun
convo noun
May 23, 2016
informal a conversation The convo around concussions mostly focuses on guys who play football, but Chastain thinks that this whole thing could be a headache for women too.

Read More