Meaning of “now” in the English Dictionary

"now" in British English

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nowadverb

uk /naʊ/ us /naʊ/

now adverb (AT PRESENT)

A1 at the present time, not in the past or future:

She used to be a teacher, but now she works in publishing.
I may eat something later, but I'm not hungry now.
Many people now own a smartphone.

A2 immediately:

I don't want to wait until tomorrow, I want it now!

B2 used to express how long something has been happening, from when it began to the present time:

She's been a vegetarian for ten years now.

used in stories or reports of past events to describe a new situation or event:

It was getting dark now, and we were tired.

used when describing a situation that is the result of what someone just said or did:

Oh yes, now I know who you mean.
any minute/moment/second/time now

B2 very soon:

The guests are coming any minute now, and the house is still a mess.
now for ... informal

used to introduce a new subject:

And now for what we're going to do tomorrow.

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now adverb (IN SPEECH)

used in statements and questions to introduce or give emphasis to what you are saying:

Now, where did I put my hat?
There was a knock at the door. Now Jan knew her mother had promised to come by, so she assumed it was her.
Hurry, now, or you'll miss the bus!
Sorry, I can't today. Now if you'd asked me yesterday, I would have said yes.

nownoun [ U ]

uk /naʊ/ us /naʊ/

the present moment or time:

Now isn't a good time to speak to him.
I thought you'd be finished by now.
You should have mentioned it before now.
That's all for now (= until a future point in time).
from now on/as from now

from this moment and always in the future:

From now on the gates will be locked at midnight.

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nowconjunction

uk /naʊ/ us /naʊ/

(Definition of “now” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"now" in American English

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nowadverb [ not gradable ]

us /nɑʊ/

now adverb [ not gradable ] (AT PRESENT)

at the present time rather than in the past or future, or immediately:

She used to work in an office, but now she works at home.
It’s now 7 o’clock, time to get up or you’ll be late for work.

Just now means either a very short time ago or at the present time:

I can’t stop to talk just now, but give me a call when you get home.

now adverb [ not gradable ] (IN SPEECH)

used in statements and questions to introduce or give emphasis to what you are saying:

Now where was I before you interrupted me?

nownoun [ U ]

us /nɑʊ/

now noun [ U ] (AT PRESENT)

the present moment or time:

That’s all for now (= until a future point in time).
From now on (= Starting at this moment and continuing in the future), the front door will be locked at midnight.

(Definition of “now” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)