odds Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “odds” in the English Dictionary

"odds" in British English

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oddsnoun [plural]

uk   /ɒdz/  us   /ɑːdz/
C1 the probability (= how ​likely it is) that a ​particular thing will or will not ​happen: If you ​drive a ​car all ​yourlife, the odds are that you'll have an ​accident at some ​point. There are ​heavy odds againstpeoplesucceeding in such a ​badeconomicclimate. What are the odds on him being (= do you ​think he will be)re-elected? The ​overall odds ofwinning a ​lotteryprize are 1 in 13. The odds are ​stacked against a woman ​succeeding (= it is not ​likely that a woman will ​succeed) in the ​business. in gambling (= the ​activity of ​riskingmoneyguessing the ​result of something), a probabilityexpressed as a ​number: The odds against my ​horsewinning (= that it will not ​win)/on my ​horsewinning (= that it will ​win) are a hundred to one. The odds that the US ​entrant will ​win the ​race are ten to one.

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(Definition of odds from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"odds" in American English

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oddsplural noun

 us   /ɑdz/
the ​likelihood that a ​particular thing will or will not ​happen: She was ​sickyesterday, so the odds are she won’t be in today.
(Definition of odds from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"odds" in Business English

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oddsnoun [plural]

uk   us   /ɒdz/
the odds of something ​happening are how probable it is that it will ​happen: the odds are against sth At the moment it seems the odds are against a ​deal.the odds are on sth/in sth's favour They are so evenly ​matched, the odds are on a ​draw.the odds are good/strong The odds are good that the country's ​transformation will ​proceed smoothly.good/better odds People ​retiring today have better odds than ever of ​living a ​longhealthylife. the odds are slim/long Given the ​pooreconomicclimate, the odds of ​success are ​slim.
how probable something is, ​expressed as a ​pair of ​numbers or a ​percentage, for ​example when betting : good/bad odds We ​think 6 to 2 are good odds.the odds are ... against/in favour of sth The odds are 100-1 against him getting the ​job.the odds of sth happening For ​taxpayers with ​incomes above $100,000 the odds of being ​audited in 2006 were 1 in 59.
be at odds (with sb/sth) to ​disagree with someone: She and her ​boss are at odds over the ​issue of ​training. On this ​issue, Britain is at odds with the rest of the EU. if two things are at odds, they are very different and cannot both be ​correct: These ​findings are at odds with our ​research. Management's and ​shareholders' ​interests seem to be at odds.
against the odds/against all odds used to say that someone has ​achieved something or ​succeeded despite this being very unlikely: Against all odds, she ​won the ​case.
the odds are against sb/in sb's favour someone is unlikely/likely to ​succeed: In a ​case like this, the odds are against the ​defendant.
over the odds UK informal more than something is really ​worth: They ​paid way over the odds for their new ​offices.
(Definition of odds from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“odds” in Business English

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