Meaning of “OK” in the English Dictionary

"OK" in British English

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OKexclamation

also okay uk /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/ us /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/

OK exclamation (AGREEING)

A1 used to show that you agree with something or agree to do something:

"I'll pay you back tomorrow." "OK, no problem."
"Could you pick me up from work?" "OK, what time?"
I mean, OK (= I accept that), I wasn't exactly polite to him, but I don't think I was that rude!

OK exclamation (ACTION)

A2 informal used as a way of showing that you are going to take action or start something new:

Okay, let's go.
Okay then, if you're ready we'll start.

More examples

  • Okay, let's get going!
  • OK, is everyone ready?
  • Okay, today I'm going to tell you a bit about Picasso.
  • OK, now that everyone's here, we'll sit down.
  • OK, Stephanie, could you tell us what you've been doing this week?

OKadjective

also okay uk /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/ us /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/ informal

OK adjective (AGREED)

A2 agreed or acceptable:

Is it okay if I bring a friend to the party?
If it's okay by/with you, I'll come over tomorrow instead.

More examples

OK adjective (ACCEPTABLE)

A1 in a satisfactory state or of a satisfactory quality:

How's Paula? Is she okay after her fall yesterday?
Are you OK? You look very pale.
"Is everything OK with you?" "Yes, fine."
I'll just check that the car's okay - that noise from the engine doesn't sound good!
Synonym

A2 not bad but certainly not good:

"Did you have a good dinner out last night?" "It was okay - I've definitely had better."
Her voice is OK, but it's nothing special.

More examples

OKadverb

also okay uk /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/ us /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/ informal

OKverb [ T ]

present tense OK's, present participle OK'ing, past tense and past participle OK'd also okay present tense okays, present participle okaying, past tense and past participle okayed uk /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/ us /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/ informal

to agree to something:

Have the committee OK'd your proposal?

OKnoun

uk /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/ us /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/

(Definition of “OK” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"OK" in American English

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OKexclamation, adjective [ not gradable ]

also okay us /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/

OK exclamation, adjective [ not gradable ] (AGREED)

agreed or acceptable; all right :

Is it OK if I bring a friend to the party?
"Will you lend me ten bucks?" "OK."
OK
verb [ T ] singular OK's, present participle OK'ing or okaying, past tense and past participle OK'd or okayed also okay us /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/

Did the boss OK your proposal?

OKadjective, adverb

also okay us /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/

OK adjective, adverb (SATISFACTORY)

in a satisfactory state or of a satisfactory quality; all right :

Are you OK? You look pale.
I hope you got home OK.

OK is used to mean not bad but also not very good:

Her voice is OK, but it’s nothing special.

OKnoun [ C ]

also okay us /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/

OK noun [ C ] (AGREED)

agreement about or permission to do something:

We’ll start building as soon as we get the OK from the owner.

OKexclamation

also okay us /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/ infml

OK exclamation (EXPRESSION)

used as a way of showing that you are going to take action or start doing or saying something new:

OK, let’s go.

(Definition of “OK” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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