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Meaning of “OK” in the English Dictionary

"OK" in British English

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OKexclamation

(also okay) uk   /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/  us   /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/
  • OK exclamation (AGREEING)

A1 used to show that you agree with something or agree to do something: "I'll pay you back tomorrow." "OK, no problem." "Could you pick me up from work?" "OK, what time?" I mean, OK (= I accept that), I wasn't exactly polite to him, but I don't think I was that rude!
  • OK exclamation (ACTION)

A2 informal used as a way of showing that you are going to take action or start something new: Okay, let's go. Okay then, if you're ready we'll start.

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  • Okay, let's get going!
  • OK, is everyone ready?
  • Okay, today I'm going to tell you a bit about Picasso.
  • OK, now that everyone's here, we'll sit down.
  • OK, Stephanie, could you tell us what you've been doing this week?

OKadjective

(also okay) uk   /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/  us   /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/ informal
  • OK adjective (AGREED)

A2 agreed or acceptable: Is it okay if I bring a friend to the party? If it's okay by/with you, I'll come over tomorrow instead.

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  • OK adjective (ACCEPTABLE)

A1 in a satisfactory state or of a satisfactory quality: How's Paula? Is she okay after her fall yesterday? Are you OK? You look very pale. "Is everything OK with you?" "Yes, fine." I'll just check that the car's okay - that noise from the engine doesn't sound good!
Synonym
A2 not bad but certainly not good: "Did you have a good dinner out last night?" "It was okay - I've definitely had better." Her voice is OK, but it's nothing special.

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OKadverb

(also okay) uk   /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/  us   /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/ informal

OKverb [T]

(present tense OK's, present participle OK'ing, past tense and past participle OK'd) (also okay (present tense okays, present participle okaying, past tense and past participle okayed)) uk   /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/  us   /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/ informal
to agree to something: Have the committee OK'd your proposal?

OKnoun

uk   /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/  us   /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/
(Definition of OK from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"OK" in American English

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OKexclamation, adjective [not gradable]

(also okay)  us   /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/
agreed or acceptable; all right : Is it OK if I bring a friend to the party? "Will you lend me ten bucks?" "OK."
OK
verb [T] (singular OK's, present participle OK'ing or okaying, past tense and past participle OK'd or okayed) (also okay)  us   /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/
Did the boss OK your proposal?

OKadjective, adverb

(also okay)  us   /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/
  • OK adjective, adverb (SATISFACTORY)

in a satisfactory state or of a satisfactory quality; all right : Are you OK? You look pale. I hope you got home OK.
OK is used to mean not bad but also not very good: Her voice is OK, but it’s nothing special.

OKnoun [C]

(also okay)  us   /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/
  • OK noun [C] (AGREED)

agreement about or permission to do something: We’ll start building as soon as we get the OK from the owner.

OKexclamation

(also okay)  us   /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/ infml
  • OK exclamation (EXPRESSION)

used as a way of showing that you are going to take action or start doing or saying something new: OK, let’s go.
(Definition of OK from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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