Meaning of “oppose” in the English Dictionary

"oppose" in British English

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opposeverb [ T ]

uk /əˈpəʊz/ us /əˈpoʊz/

B2 to disagree with something or someone, often by speaking or fighting against it, him, or her:

The proposed new testing system has been vigorously opposed by teachers.
Most of the local residents opposed the closing of the school.
[ + -ing verb ] I would certainly oppose changing the system.

More examples

  • Many people oppose the death penalty because of the possibility of miscarriages of justice.
  • The military has opposed any cuts in defence spending.
  • Many locals are strongly opposed to the development.
  • He opposes any kind of nuclear waste being dumped at sea.
  • Hargreaves is the MP who got into trouble with his party's chief whip for opposing the tax reform.

(Definition of “oppose” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"oppose" in American English

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opposeverb [ T ]

us /əˈpoʊz/

to disagree with something, often by speaking or fighting against it:

opposing
adjective [ not gradable ] us /əˈpoʊ·zɪŋ/

The opposing sides failed to reach agreement today.

(Definition of “oppose” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"oppose" in Business English

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opposeverb [ T ]

uk /əˈpəʊz/ us

to disagree with something or someone, and speak or take action against them:

Most local residents opposed the building of the shopping mall.
The proposed tax rise has been vigorously opposed by business leaders.
oppose doing sth I would certainly oppose changing the system.

(Definition of “oppose” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)