overlap Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “overlap” in the English Dictionary

"overlap" in British English

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overlapverb

uk   /ˌəʊ.vəˈlæp/  us   /ˌoʊ.vɚˈlæp/ (-pp-)
[I or T] to cover something partly by going over its edge; to cover part of the same space: The fence is made of panels that overlap (each other).
C2 [I] If two or more activities, subjects, or periods of time overlap, they have some parts that are the same: My musical tastes don't overlap with my brother's at all.
C2 [I or T] If a football player overlaps, they pass the ball to another member of their team and then run beyond that player so that they are ready to receive the ball again.
overlapping
adjective uk   /ˌəʊ.vəˈlæp.ɪŋ/  us   /ˌoʊ.vɚˈlæp.ɪŋ/
The overlapping slates of the roofs in the mountain village resembled fish scales. The word has two separate but overlapping meanings (= parts of the meanings are the same).

overlapnoun

uk   /ˈəʊ.və.læp/  us   /ˈoʊ.vɚ.læp/
(Definition of overlap from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"overlap" in American English

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overlapverb

 us   /ˌoʊ·vərˈlæp/ (-pp-)
  • overlap verb (PARTLY COVER)

[I/T] to partly cover something with a layer of something else: [I] The edges of the wallpaper should overlap slightly.
  • overlap verb (SHARE FEATURES)

[I] to have some parts or features that are the same: Their core businesses do not overlap much.
overlap
noun [C]  us   /ˌoʊ·vərˈlæp/
There's little overlap between James's playlist and ours.
(Definition of overlap from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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