Meaning of “overload” in the English Dictionary

"overload" in British English

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overloadverb [ T ]

uk /ˌəʊ.vəˈləʊd/ us /ˌoʊ.vɚˈloʊd/

C1 to put too many things in or on something:

Don't overload the washing machine, or it won't get the clothes clean.

to put too much electricity through an electrical system

C2 to give someone more work or problems than they can deal with:

Try not to overload yourself with work.

overloadnoun [ C or U ]

uk /ˈəʊ.və.ləʊd/ us /ˈoʊ.vɚ.loʊd/

(Definition of “overload” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"overload" in American English

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overloadverb [ T ]

us /ˌoʊ·vərˈloʊd/

to put too great a load in or on something:

Don’t overload the washer or it won’t work properly.
fig. I can’t go out tonight – I’m overloaded with work (= I have a lot of work to do).

If you overload an electrical system, you put too much electricity through it.

(Definition of “overload” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"overload" in Business English

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overloadverb [ T ]

uk /ˌəʊvəˈləʊd/ us

to give something or someone too much work:

Many companies limit personal downloads so that they don't overload the computer system.
We are doing our best in a highly competitive environment with an overloaded staff.

to put too many things in or on something:

The company had overloaded the truck, which was illegal.
overload sth with sth His desk is overloaded with papers and books.

to put too much electricity through an electrical system:

Avoid overloading outlets and extension cords.

overloadnoun [ U or S ]

uk /ˈəʊvələʊd/ us

too much of something:

an overload of sth There is an overload of factors that confront consumers in the marketplace.
Investors are already swamped with information and there is a serious danger of overload.

(Definition of “overload” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)