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Meaning of “overwork” in the English Dictionary

"overwork" in American English

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overworkverb [I/T]

 us   /ˌoʊ·vərˈwɜrk/
to ​work or make a ​person or ​animalwork too hard or too ​long: [T] She overworks her ​staff.
overwork
noun [U]  us   /ˈoʊ·vərˌwɜrk/
Her ​headaches are ​likely caused by overwork.
overworked
adjective  us   /ˌoʊ·vərˈwɜrkt/
I ​feel overworked and ​underpaid.
(Definition of overwork from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"overwork" in Business English

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overworkverb [I or T]

uk   us   /ˌəʊvəˈwɜːk/
HR to ​work too much or cause someone to ​work too much: The ​union says they are overworking us to the ​point where our ​health is affected. She had been overworking and needed a ​vacation.
overworked
adjective
Nurses ​feel overworked and ​underpaid. Overworked ​employees are taking more ​sick days.

overworknoun [U]

uk   /ˈəʊvəwɜːk/  us   /ˈoʊvɚwɝːk/
HR the ​act of ​working too hard or too much: Stress and overwork are blamed for high ​levels of ​absenteeism.
(Definition of overwork from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “overwork”
in Korean 과로…
in Arabic إرهاق…
in Malaysian kerja terlalu kuat…
in French surmenage…
in Chinese (Traditional) (使)勞累過度, (使)工作太累…
in Italian troppo lavoro…
in Spanish trabajo excesivo…
in Vietnamese sự làm việc quá sức…
in Portuguese excesso de trabalho…
in Thai ทำงานมากไป…
in German die Überarbeitung…
in Catalan excés de feina…
in Japanese 過労…
in Chinese (Simplified) (使)劳累过度, (使)工作太累…
in Indonesian bekerja terlalu keras…
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“overwork” in British English

“overwork” in American English

“overwork” in Business English

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