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Meaning of “page” in the English Dictionary

"page" in British English

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pagenoun [C]

uk   /peɪdʒ/ us   /peɪdʒ/
  • page noun [C] (PAPER)

A1 written abbreviation p. a side of one of the pieces of paper in a book, newspaper, or magazine, usually with a number printed on it: For details on how to enter the competition, see page 134. The article appeared on the front page of the New York Times.
one of the sheets of paper in a book, newspaper, or magazine: Several pages have been torn out of this book.

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  • page noun [C] (BOY)

(in the past) a boy who worked as a servant for a knight and who was learning to become a knight
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pageverb [T]

uk   /peɪdʒ/ us   /peɪdʒ/
(Definition of page from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"page" in American English

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pagenoun [C]

us   /peɪdʒ/
  • page noun [C] (PAPER)

abbreviation p. one side of a sheet of paper in a book, newspaper, magazine, etc.: What page are the baseball standings on? It’s a terrific novel, but it’s over 800 pages long. The article is continued on page 43 (= a side of a sheet of paper numbered 43).
  • page noun [C] (COMPUTER)

a group of text and images shown together on a computer screen: Do you have a home page? It took her only 20 minutes to customize a Web page.

pageverb [T]

us   /peɪdʒ/
  • page verb [T] (COMMUNICATE)

to communicate with someone by having that person’s name announced publicly or by sending a signal to an electronic device the person is carrying: Doctors are paged by their answering services at all hours.
(Definition of page from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"page" in Business English

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pagenoun [C]

uk   /peɪdʒ/ us  
abbreviation p a side of one of the pieces of paper in a book, newspaper, or magazine, usually with a number printed on it: Open your book and look at page nine. Even the major newspapers let important news slip off the front page.
[often plural] one of the sheets of paper in a book, newspaper, or magazine: A page had been ripped out of the magazine.in the pages of sth There were several interesting articles to be found in the pages of the Wall Street Journal today. the financial/sports/news pages the business/culture/advertising pages
also web page INTERNET one part of a website: Your page on the social networking site enables you to share your business profile. We added a jobs page to the website.
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IT the text of an electronic document that you can see on a computer screen: You have to scroll down the page to find the information you're looking for.
COMMUNICATIONS a message received on a pager (= a small piece of electronic equipment that moves or makes a noise to tell you to phone someone): send a page to sb I asked the nurse to send a page to the doctor.
be on the same page
to have the same ideas as someone else: Everyone in the office has to be on the same page about what our top priorities are.

pageverb [T]

uk   /peɪdʒ/ us   COMMUNICATIONS
to call a person using a loudspeaker in a public place: He was paged at the airport and told to return home immediately.
to send a message to someone's pager : As soon as you're finished with the download, page me.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of page from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of page?
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“page” in Business English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
by ,
May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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biodegrade

to decay naturally and in a way that is not harmful

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decision fatigue noun
decision fatigue noun
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