panic Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “panic” in the English Dictionary

"panic" in British English

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panicnoun [C usually singular, U]

uk   us   /ˈpæn.ɪk/
B2 a ​suddenstrongfeeling of ​fear that ​preventsreasonablethought and ​action: a ​state of panic Panic spread through the ​crowd as the ​bulletsstarted to ​fly. Carmel was in a panic about her ​exam. He got in(to) a panic that he would ​forget his ​lines on ​stage.
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panicverb [I or T]

uk   us   /ˈpæn.ɪk/ (present participle panicking, past tense and past participle panicked)
B2 to ​suddenlyfeel so ​worried or ​frightened that you cannot ​think or ​behavecalmly or ​reasonably: Don't panic! Everything will be ​okay. The ​sound of ​gunfire panicked the ​crowd. The ​boss always panics over/about the ​budget every ​month.
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(Definition of panic from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"panic" in American English

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panicnoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈpæn·ɪk/
a ​sudden, ​strongfeeling of ​anxiety or ​fear that ​preventsreasonablethought and ​action and may ​spread to ​influence many ​people: [U] When ​firebroke out, 602 ​peopledied in the panic that ​ensued. Panic is also used to ​describe any ​behavior that is ​sudden, ​extreme, and ​results from ​fear: [C] A ​brief panic ​overtook the ​financialmarkets in ​October.
verb [I/T]  us   /ˈpæn·ɪk/ (present participle panicking, past tense and past participle panicked)
[I] The ​driver who ​hit him panicked and ​fled.
adjective  us   /ˈpæn·ɪ·ki/
a panicky ​feeling
(Definition of panic from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"panic" in Business English

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panicnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈpænɪk/
a sudden ​strongfeeling of fear that prevents ​reasonablethought and ​action: panic about/over sth There is no cause for panic about ​oilprices.a state/wave of panic The ​government was in a ​state of panic.cause/trigger panic The ​drop in ​prices could cause panic among ​investors. There is no sense of panic yet or any ​feeling that this is the ​start of a ​long-termdecline in the ​pound.

panicverb [I or T]

uk   us   /ˈpænɪk/ (panicking, panicked, panicked)
to suddenly ​feel so worried or frightened that you cannot ​think or ​behave reasonably, or to cause someone to ​feel this: There is no need for ​homebuyers to panic.panic about/over sth Should ​people with ​savings panic about the ​safety of their ​money? Oil ​producers were panicked by the ​drop in ​oilprices.panic sb into doing sth The delay in ​consumerspendingmeans that ​shops may be panicked into ​cuttingprices.

panicadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /ˈpænɪk/
resulting from a ​feeling of panic: panic buying/selling Panic ​buying has ​led to fears that almost half the ​gasstations could ​run out of ​fuel by tomorrow.a panic measure/reaction The ​privatemeeting was a panic ​reaction to the ​news of the ​merger.
(Definition of panic from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “panic”
in Korean 공황…
in Arabic فَزَع, ذُعْر, هَلَع…
in Malaysian panik…
in French panique…
in Russian паника…
in Chinese (Traditional) 恐慌,驚慌…
in Italian panico…
in Turkish panik, büyük korku…
in Polish panika…
in Spanish pánico…
in Vietnamese hoảng loạn…
in Portuguese pânico…
in Thai ความตื่นตกใจ…
in German die Panik…
in Catalan pànic…
in Japanese パニック…
in Chinese (Simplified) 恐慌,惊慌…
in Indonesian kepanikan, ketakutan…
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“panic” in British English

“panic” in American English

“panic” in Business English

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