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Meaning of “pass” in the English Dictionary

"pass" in British English

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passverb

uk   /pɑːs/ us   /pæs/
  • pass verb (GO PAST)

B1 [I or T] to go past something or someone or move in relation to it, him, or her: I passed him on the stairs this morning. You should only pass a slower vehicle if it is safe to do so. If you pass a supermarket, could you get me some milk? I was just passing by (= going past the place where you are), so I thought I'd drop in for a chat. A momentary look of anxiety passed across his face. A cloud passed over the sun.
[T] to go past a particular point in time: Don't buy goods that have passed their sell-by date.
C2 [T] to go past something by being greater in amount or degree: The company's turnover is expected to pass the $10 million mark by the end of this year.
C2 [I] If you say a state or feeling will pass, you mean it will disappear: Don't worry, his depression is only temporary - it'll soon pass.

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  • pass verb (SUCCEED)

A2 [I or T] to be successful in an exam, course, etc.: Guess what? I've passed my driving test! The exam is so hard that only five percent of all applicants pass.

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  • pass verb (GIVE)

B1 [T] to give something to someone: Could you pass the salt please? I asked if I could see the letter, so she passed it to me reluctantly. [+ two objects] Gerald passed me the note./Gerald passed the note to me. Genes are the means by which parents' characteristics are passed on to their children.
C2 [I or T] In sports, if you pass the ball, you kick, throw, or hit it to someone in your team.
[T] If you pass money, you give someone false or stolen money without telling them: [+ two objects] I haven't trusted him since he passed me a forged $100 bill. She was arrested for passing stolen cheques.

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  • pass verb (TIME)

B1 [I] When time passes, it goes past: Time seems to pass (by) so slowly when you're bored. I was a little worried about the party, but the evening passed without any great disasters.
B2 [T] If you pass a period of time, you do something to stop yourself being bored during that period: The visitors pass their days swimming, windsurfing, and playing volleyball.

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  • pass verb (APPROVE)

B2 [T] (of an official group of people) to give approval to something, especially by voting to make it law: The government passed a law to restrict the sale of guns. The food supplement had been passed as safe for human consumption.

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  • pass verb (EXCRETE)

[T] formal to remove waste from the body: to pass urine
pass blood formal
to have blood in your urine or faeces (= solid waste): If you pass blood, you should go and see your doctor.

passnoun

uk   /pɑːs/ us   /pæs/
  • pass noun (EXAM RESULT)

B2 [C] UK a successful result in an exam: Jon Hill achieved two grade A passes at A-level.
[C] US a successful result in a course or exam for which the student will not be given a mark: I got a pass in my Literature course.

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  • pass noun (DOCUMENT)

B1 [C] an official document or ticket showing that you have the right to go somewhere or use a particular form of transport: a bus pass a boarding pass My guest pass allows me to use the club's facilities free of charge.
[C] mainly US a document that allows a student to leave a class for a particular reason: She had a pass to go to the library.

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  • pass noun (PATH)

[C] a path or road between or over mountains: a mountain pass
  • pass noun (SEXUAL ACTION)

make a pass at sb informal
to speak to or touch someone in a way that shows you would like to start a sexual relationship with them
(Definition of pass from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"pass" in American English

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passverb

us   /pæs/
  • pass verb (GO PAST)

[I/T] to go past or move beyond something or someone: [T] A car passed us doing 70 miles per hour. [I] I was just passing by and stopped to say hello.
  • pass verb (GO THROUGH)

[I/T] to cause something to go around, across, through, etc., something else, or to be positioned in such a way: [T] Pass the wire through the slot and pull it out from the other side. [I always + adv/prep] The causeway passes across the bay and takes you to the mainland.
  • pass verb (GIVE)

[I/T] to give something to someone: [T] Please pass the bread.
[I/T] In team sports played with a ball, if you pass, you throw, kick, or hit the ball to someone on your team.
  • pass verb (DO WELL)

[I/T] to be successful in a test, exam, or course, or to judge someone as having been successful in it: [T] The professor said that if I passed the final exam, she’ll pass me.
  • pass verb (TIME)

[I/T] to go past or through a period of time: [I] The hours passed quickly.
  • pass verb (APPROVE)

[I/T] to approve or be approved by a group having authority, esp. by voting: [T] The bill passed both houses of Congress and was signed by the president. [I] The bill passed unanimously.
  • pass verb (NOT DO)

[I] to choose not to do, have, take part in, or take a turn at something: I think I’ll pass on going to the movies.
  • pass verb (BE ACCEPTED)

[I] to be accepted as being something that you are not, esp. something better or more attractive: Marion looks so young she could pass for 30. Do this jacket and skirt match well enough to pass as a suit?
passing
adjective [not gradable] us   /ˈpæs·ɪŋ/

passnoun [C]

us   /pæs/
  • pass noun [C] (DOCUMENT)

an official document or ticket showing that you have the right to go somewhere or do something: We bought three-day passes to the amusement park. The children get bus passes to travel to and from school.
  • pass noun [C] (DOING WELL)

a mark given to show that a student has successfully completed a course or an exam
  • pass noun [C] (GIVING)

the act of giving or sending the ball to another player on your own team: The receiver dropped the pass.
(Definition of pass from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"pass" in Business English

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passverb

uk   /pɑːs/ us   /pæs/
[I or T] to go past something or someone or move in relation to it or them: I was just passing by, so I thought I'd drop in for a chat.
[T] to go past a particular point in time: Don't buy goods which have passed their sell-by date.
[T] to go past something by being greater in amount or degree: As the world's largest convenience store chain, it just passed McDonald's in the number of worldwide outlets.pass the $1m/€100m/£10bn, etc. mark The company is expected to pass the $10m mark by the end of this year.
[I] if you say a situation or feeling will pass, you mean it will disappear: We're in a difficult economic situation, but it will pass eventually.
[I or T] to be successful in an examination, course, etc.: All interviewees need to pass a basic math and literacy test.
[T] to give something to someone: Could you pass me that file, please?
[T] if you pass money, you give someone false or stolen money without telling them: Police have warned businesses that someone is passing stolen checks in the area.
[I] when time passes, it goes past: A lot of time has passed since we opened our first store.
[T] if you pass time, you spend time doing something: With more people passing time in the terminal, airport officials try to make them comfortable.
[T] to give approval to something, especially by voting to make it law: California passed a law in September to cut carbon dioxide emissions by 25%.
[I] to choose not to answer a question: pass on sth Asked whether he thought the FA should intervene, he replied diplomatically: 'Can I pass on this one?'
[I] to change from one condition to another: pass from sth to sth As new electronic gadgets fall in price, they pass from a niche product to a mass product.

passnoun [C]

uk   /pɑːs/ us   /pæs/
an official document or ticket which shows that you have the right to go somewhere or use a particular form of transport: a parking/security/visitor's pass Sign in at reception and they will give you a visitor's pass.an annual/season/three-day pass Frequent visitors of national forests can save money by buying an annual pass.
a successful result in an examination: This candidate got 4 grade A passes at A-level.
(Definition of pass from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“pass” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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