passage Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “passage” in the English Dictionary

"passage" in British English

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passagenoun

uk   /ˈpæs.ɪdʒ/ us   /ˈpæs.ɪdʒ/
  • passage noun (CONNECTING WAY)

B2 [C] also passageway, a usually long and narrow part of a building with rooms on one or both sides, or a covered path that connects places: A narrow passage led directly through the house into the garden. The bathroom's on the right at the end of the passage.
[C] a hollow part of the body through which something goes: the nasal passages the anal passage

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  • passage noun (PART)

B2 [C] a short piece of writing or music that is part of a larger piece of work: Several passages from the book were printed in a national newspaper before it was published.

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  • passage noun (TRAVEL)

[U] formal travel, especially as a way of escape: The gunman demanded a plane and safe passage to an unspecified destination.
[S] old-fashioned a journey, especially over the sea: He had booked his passage to Rio de Janeiro.
work your passage old-fashioned
to do work on a ship during your trip instead of paying for a ticket
  • passage noun (TIME)

the passage of time literary
the process of time going past: Memories fade with the passage of time.
  • passage noun (LAW)

[U] formal the official approval of something, especially a new law: He again urged passage of a constitutional amendment outlawing abortion.
(Definition of passage from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"passage" in American English

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passagenoun

us   /ˈpæs·ɪdʒ/
  • passage noun (CONNECTING WAY)

[C] also passageway, /ˈpæs·ɪdʒˌweɪ/ a usually long and narrow part of a building with rooms on one or both sides, or an enclosed path that connects places: A narrow passage led through the house to the yard.
[C] also passageway, /ˈpæs·ɪdʒˌweɪ/ A passage is also an entrance or opening: the nasal passages
  • passage noun (PART)

[C] a short piece of writing or music that is part of a larger piece: a short passage for a trumpet solo
  • passage noun (TRAVEL)

[U] the right to travel or to leave a place: We booked passage on a cruise ship. He was guaranteed safe passage to the border.
(Definition of passage from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"passage" in Business English

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passagenoun

uk   /ˈpæsɪdʒ/ us  
[C] also passageway, /ˈpæsɪdzweɪ/ a usually long and narrow part of a building with rooms on one or both sides, or a covered path which connects places: There's a passage on the side of the building – the maintenance department is along there.
[C] a short piece of writing that is part of a larger piece of work: There's one passage in the report which seems incorrect.
[U] an act of moving through a place: Despite security checks, our passage through the airport was fairly quick.
[U or S] the way that time passes: The directors are hopeful that, with the passage of time, trading conditions will improve.
[ U] official approval of something, especially a new law: passage of sth Protesters are opposing passage of the new energy bill through parliament.
(Definition of passage from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“passage” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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