patience Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “patience” in the English Dictionary

"patience" in British English

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patiencenoun [U]

uk   us   /ˈpeɪ.ʃəns/
  • patience noun [U] (QUALITY)

B2 the ​ability to ​wait, or to ​continue doing something ​despite difficulties, or to ​suffer without ​complaining or ​becomingannoyed: You have to have such a lot of patience when you're ​dealing with ​kids. In the end I lost my patience and ​shouted at her. He's a good ​teacher, but he doesn't have much patience with the ​slowerpupils. Making small-scale ​models takes/​requires a ​greatdeal of patience. Their ​youngestson was ​beginning to try my patience (= ​annoy me). Patience - they'll be here ​soon!
Opposite

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of patience from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"patience" in American English

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patiencenoun [U]

 us   /ˈpeɪ·ʃəns/
the ​ability to ​acceptdelay, ​suffering, or ​annoyance without ​complaining or ​becomingangry: He’s a man of ​great patience. Her ​constantcomplaining was ​beginning to ​test/​try my patience.
patient
adjective  us   /ˈpeɪ·ʃənt/
Just be patient – dinner’s ​almostready.
patiently
adverb  us   /ˈpeɪ·ʃənt·li/
He ​waited patiently for his ​name to be called.
(Definition of patience from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “patience”
in Arabic صَبْر…
in Korean 참을성…
in Portuguese paciência…
in Catalan paciència…
in Japanese 忍耐力, 我慢強さ…
in Chinese (Simplified) 素质, 忍耐,耐心…
in Turkish sabırlılık, sabır, tahammül…
in Russian терпение, пасьянс…
in Chinese (Traditional) 素質, 忍耐,耐心…
in Italian pazienza…
in Polish cierpliwość, pasjans…
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“patience” in British English

“patience” in American English

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