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Meaning of “pattern” in the English Dictionary

"pattern" in British English

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patternnoun

uk   /ˈpæt.ən/ us   /ˈpæt̬.ɚn/
  • pattern noun (WAY)

B2 [C] a particular way in which something is done, is organized, or happens: The pattern of family life has been changing over recent years. A pattern is beginning to emerge from our analysis of the accident data. In this type of mental illness, the usual pattern is bouts of depression alternating with elation. Many behaviour(al) patterns have been identified in the chimp colony.

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  • pattern noun (ARRANGEMENT)

B1 [C] any regularly repeated arrangement, especially a design made from repeated lines, shapes, or colours on a surface: Look, the frost has made a beautiful pattern on the window. The curtains had a floral pattern.

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(Definition of pattern from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"pattern" in American English

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patternnoun [C]

us   /ˈpæt̬·ərn/
  • pattern noun [C] (WAY)

a particular way in which something is done or organized, or in which something happens: Our weather pattern comes from the northwest. A whole variety of behavior patterns affect infants.
  • pattern noun [C] (SHAPES)

a regular arrangement of lines, shapes, or colors: A human fingerprint can be viewed as a geometric pattern.
A pattern is also a design or set of shapes that show how to make something: a dress pattern
patterned
adjective us   /ˈpæt̬·ərnd/
a rose and black patterned skirt
(Definition of pattern from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"pattern" in Business English

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patternnoun

uk   /ˈpætən/ us  
[C] a particular way in which something usually happens or is done: a pattern of sth A pattern of sluggish consumer demand made growth targets impossibly high.a pattern emerges A pattern is emerging of a steady reduction in costs and increased sales.establish/fall into/follow a pattern The decision follows a pattern that has become increasingly common in the food industry.identify/reveal/show a pattern An examination of official documents shows a pattern of construction cost overruns.a changing/different/similar pattern changing patterns of employmenta consumption/growth/spending pattern High joblessness and changing consumption patterns will result in moderate sales. Organizations must address the needs of workers with diverse career patterns and goals.
[C] a way of doing something that other people, organizations, etc. can copy: set the pattern for sth The talks have set the pattern for trying to solve problems within the industry.
a holding pattern
a situation where there is little activity or change, and people are not doing business, spending money, etc. because they cannot decide what to do next: be in/go into a holding pattern Several deals went into an immediate holding pattern after the crisis.

patternadjective [before noun]

uk   /ˈpætən/ us   HR
used to describe an agreement based on similar agreements with other companies: a pattern agreement/contract The contract was viewed by bargainers as a pattern agreement to be used in negotiations with the car company. The traditional pattern bargaining that went on in the auto industry has gone.

patternverb [T]

uk   /ˈpætən/ us  
be patterned after/on sth
to be copied from something or to be very similar to something: The facility will employ 150 people and be patterned after the steel fastener facility in Saint Joe, Indiana.
(Definition of pattern from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“pattern” in American English

“pattern” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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