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Meaning of “peak” in the English Dictionary

"peak" in British English

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peaknoun [C]

uk   /piːk/  us   /piːk/
  • peak noun [C] (HIGHEST POINT)

B2 the ​highest, ​strongest, or ​bestpoint, ​value, or ​level of ​skill: Prices reach a peak during ​August. Beat the ​eggwhites until they are ​stiff enough to ​formfirm peaks. We ​saw a ​victory by an ​athlete at the very peak of her ​fitness and ​career.

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  • peak noun [C] (MOUNTAIN)

B1 the ​pointedtop of a ​mountain, or the ​mountain itself: It is one of the most ​difficult peaks to ​climb.

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  • peak noun [C] (HAT PART)

mainly UK (US usually visor) the ​flatcurvedpart of a cap that goes above the ​eyes of the ​person who is ​wearing it

peakadjective [before noun]

uk   /piːk/  us   /piːk/
Peak ​times are the ​times when most ​people are using or doing something: Traffic ​congestion is really ​bad at peak periods (= when it is ​busiest). It is most ​expensive to ​advertise at peak ​viewingtimes (= those with the most ​peoplewatching). Don't go there in the peak (= ​busiest) season - it'll be ​hot and ​crowded.
Peak ​levels or ​rates are when they are at ​theirhighest: peak ​rateelectricity
mainly UK often humorous used to ​describe something that has ​become so ​popular and ​common that it is no ​longerfashionable or ​peoplestart to ​dislike it: I ​think we've ​reached peak ​beard (= ​beards were ​fashionable, but now too many ​people have them).

peakverb [I]

uk   /piːk/  us   /piːk/
(Definition of peak from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"peak" in American English

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peakverb [I]

 us   /pik/
  • peak verb [I] (REACH HIGHEST POINT)

to ​reach the ​highestpoint, ​value, or ​level: Official ​figures show ​unemployment peaked in ​November.
peak
adjective [not gradable]  us   /pik/
During the peak ​season, the ​populationswells with over 50,000 tourists.

peaknoun [C]

 us   /pik/
  • peak noun [C] (MOUNTAIN TOP)

the ​pointedtop of a ​mountain, or the ​mountain itself
(Definition of peak from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"peak" in Business English

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peaknoun [C]

uk   us   /piːk/
a ​period during which something ​reaches its ​highestlevel, ​price, ​rate, etc.: At its peak, the ​company was ​valued at £1.5 ​billion. Several ​internetserviceproviderstested in the evening peak ​failed to ​deliver the new ​target for ​high-speedinternet.be above/below the peak of sth The ​shares have ​started to ​recover but are still far below their 12-month peak.hit/reach/rise to a peak Investors were looking beyond the UK ​market because they feared it might have ​reached a peak. all-time/​record/​highest peak Markets are ​subject to ​strong peaks and ​troughsdue to ​economiccycles.
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peakadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /piːk/
relating to the ​highestlevel, ​price, ​rate, etc. that something ​reaches: The comparison ​siteprovidesinformation on peak and ​off-peakrates across all the ​majormobilenetworks. Service ​providerskeep spare ​capacity to ​meet peak ​demand. peak ​efficiency/​performance
relating to a ​period of ​time during which more ​people are using a ​service or ​system than during any other ​period: The new ​facility could ​increase the ​number of ​packagesshipped to 30,000 from 10,000 during the peak ​holidayseason.peak hours/periods/times The Underground often ​operates a crowd-control ​system at peak ​periods.
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peakverb [I]

uk   us   /piːk/ (also peak out)
to ​reach the ​highestlevel, ​price, ​rate, etc.: Official ​figures show that ​unemployment peaked in November.peak (out) at sth There was ​growing belief in the City that ​baserates may have peaked at 4.75%. Despite ​talk of the ​market peaking out, ​investors are still ​buying rather than ​selling.
(Definition of peak from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“peak” in Business English

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