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Meaning of “phenomenon” in the English Dictionary

"phenomenon" in British English

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phenomenonnoun [C]

uk   /fəˈnɒm.ɪ.nən/ us   /fəˈnɑː.mə.nɑːn/ plural phenomena uk   // us  
  • phenomenon noun [C] (EXISTING THING)

C1 something that exists and can be seen, felt, tasted, etc., especially something unusual or interesting: Gravity is a natural phenomenon. Do you believe in the paranormal and other psychic phenomena? There's evidence to suggest that child abuse is not just a recent phenomenon.

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  • phenomenon noun [C] (SUCCESS)

someone or something that is extremely successful, often because of special qualities or abilities: The Beatles were a phenomenon - nobody had heard anything like them before.
(Definition of phenomenon from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"phenomenon" in American English

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phenomenonnoun

us   /fɪˈnɑm·əˌnɑn, -nən/
  • phenomenon noun (EXPERIENCE)

[C] plural phenomena /fɪˈnɑm·ə·nə/ anything that is or can be experienced or felt, esp. something that is noticed because it is unusual or new: We discussed the ever-growing popularity of talk radio, and wondered how to explain this phenomenon.
  • phenomenon noun (SPECIAL PERSON/THING)

[C usually sing] plural phenomenons someone or something special, esp. because it is completely different or extremely unusual: He was a kind of phenomenon, an actor running for president.
(Definition of phenomenon from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“phenomenon” in British English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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