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Meaning of “pin” in the English Dictionary

"pin" in British English

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pinnoun [C]

uk   /pɪn/  us   /pɪn/
  • pin noun [C] (METAL STICK)

B1 a ​smallthinpiece of ​metal with a ​point at one end, ​especially used for ​temporarilyholdingpieces of ​cloth together: I'll ​keep the ​trouserpatch in ​place with pins while I ​sew it on.
a ​thinpiece of ​metal: If you ​pull the pin out of a hand-grenade, it'll ​explode. a two-pin/three-pin ​electricalplug Doctors ​inserted a ​metal pin in his ​leg to ​hold the ​bones together.
a ​decorativeobject, used as ​jewellery: a ​hat/​tie pin
US a brooch

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  • pin noun [C] (IN CHESS)

specialized games In the ​game of chess, a pin is a ​specialmove that ​stops the other ​player from ​moving one of ​theirpieces, because to ​move it will put another more ​valuablepiece in ​danger: That ​nasty pin ​stopped me from ​moving my ​knight.

pinverb

uk   /pɪn/  us   /pɪn/ (-nn-)
  • pin verb (METAL STICK)

B1 [T + adv/prep] to ​fasten something with a pin: A ​largepicture of the ​president was pinned to/(up) on the ​officewall. She had pinned up her ​beautifullonghair.
[T] US old-fashioned When a ​young man pins a ​young woman, he gives her a ​piece of ​jewellery to show that they ​love each other.

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PINnoun [C]

uk   /pɪn/  us   /pɪn/ (also PIN number)
(Definition of pin from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"pin" in American English

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pinnoun [C]

 us   /pɪn/
  • pin noun [C] (FASTENER)

a ​thinpiece of ​stiffwire with a ​pointed end that you can ​stick through two things to ​fasten them together: Mary put a pin in her ​hair to ​hold her ​hat on.
A pin can also be ​decorative and used as ​jewelry: She ​wore a ​beautifulgold pin on her ​coat.

pinverb

 us   /pɪn/ (-nn-)
  • pin verb (HOLD FIRMLY)

[T always + adv/prep] to ​hold someone or something ​firmly in the same ​position or ​place: After the ​earthquake there were several ​people pinned in the ​wreckage. fig. No one could pin the ​label of "​conservative" on him (= ​call him that).
  • pin verb (FASTENER)

[T] fastened: She ​kept a ​map of Manhattan pinned on the ​wall.

PINnoun [C]

 us   /pɪn/
abbreviation forpersonalidentificationnumber (= a ​secretnumber that can be ​read by a ​computer to ​prove who you are): I ​punched my PIN into the ​ATMmachine and took out $100.
(Definition of pin from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"PIN" in Business English

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PINnoun [C]

uk   us   /pɪn/ (also PIN number) BANKING
abbreviation forpersonalidentificationnumber: a ​secretnumber used with a ​bankcard or creditcard to get ​money from a ​cashmachine or ​pay for ​goods in a ​store: Please ​enter your PIN ​number.
(Definition of PIN from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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