pledge Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “pledge” in the English Dictionary

"pledge" in British English

See all translations

pledgenoun [C]

uk   /pledʒ/  us   /pledʒ/
a serious or formal promise, especially one to give money or to be a friend, or something that you give as a sign that you will keep a promise: [+ to infinitive] All the candidates have given/made pledges not to raise taxes if they are elected. Thousands of people made pledges (= promised to give money) to the charity campaign. I give you this ring as a pledge of my everlasting love for you.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

pledgeverb [T]

uk   /pledʒ/  us   /pledʒ/
to make a serious or formal promise to give or do something: We are asking people to pledge their support for our campaign. If you join the armed forces, you have to pledge allegiance to your country. So far, £50,000 has been pledged (= people have promised to pay this amount) in response to the appeal. [+ to infinitive] Both sides have pledged to end the fighting. I've been pledged to secrecy.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of pledge from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"pledge" in American English

See all translations

pledgenoun [C]

 us   /pledʒ/
a formal promise, or something that is given as a sign that you will keep a promise: a pledge of friendship The telethon raised $150,000 in pledges for leukemia research.
(Definition of pledge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"pledge" in Business English

See all translations

pledgeverb [T]

uk   us   /pledʒ/
to make a formal promise to do something: pledge to do sth The UK chief executive has pledged to slash costs by £150m a year by 2014.pledge $32m/£100,000, etc. to/for sth EU leaders pledged $1.2 billion to the region over the next 18 months.pledge that sth He pledged that a reduction in the burden of taxation will become the central economic objective of the government.
LAW to give something valuable to a person or organization that has lent you money, which they can keep if you fail to pay back the loan: pledge sth as collateral/security Shares are frequently pledged as collateral for loans.

pledgenoun [C]

uk   us   /pledʒ/
a formal promise to do something: a campaign/election/manifesto pledgea pledge to do sth Analysts warn that OPEC's pledge to ramp up oil production in order to ease record crude prices will not have the desired effect.make/honour/sign a pledge Campaigners have accused Congress of failing to honour its US funding pledges.a pledge that sth Their goal of increasing electricity production from renewables by 40% has been reinforced by a pledge that they will not support further development of nuclear power.
LAW something valuable that is given to a person or organization that has lent you money, which they can keep if you fail to pay back the loan: Serious financial irregularities took place, including the pledge of already paid-for securities.
(Definition of pledge from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of pledge?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“pledge” in British English

“pledge” in Business English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
by ,
May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

Read More 

Word of the Day

galaxy

one of the independent groups of stars in the universe

Word of the Day

trigger warning noun
trigger warning noun
May 02, 2016
a warning that a subject may trigger unpleasant emotions or memories This is not, I should stress, an argument that trigger warnings should become commonplace on campus.

Read More