plummet Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “plummet” in the English Dictionary

"plummet" in American English

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plummetverb [I]

 us   /ˈplʌm·ɪt/
to ​fall very ​quickly and ​suddenly: Temperatures plummeted last ​night. The ​parachutefailed to ​open and he plummeted to the ​ground.
(Definition of plummet from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"plummet" in Business English

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plummetverb [I or T]

uk   us   /ˈplʌmɪt/
to go down in ​amount or ​value very quickly and suddenly: Houseprices have plummeted in recent months.plummet (by) sth First-half ​advertisingrevenues plummeted 13%, compared with the same ​period a ​year ago.plummet to sth The ​food retailer's ​shares plummeted 17.5p to 227.5p.

plummetnoun [C, usually singular]

uk   us   /ˈplʌmɪt/
a sudden and large ​reduction in ​value or ​amount: a plummet in sth The ​petrolretailer denies its 25% ​dividendhike is to prop up the ​shares after a plummet in the ​price from 270p to 118p.
(Definition of plummet from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “plummet”
in Korean 급락하다…
in Arabic يَهبِط…
in Malaysian batu ladung…
in French tomber à pic…
in Russian стремительно падать…
in Chinese (Traditional) 暴跌,急遽下降…
in Italian precipitare…
in Turkish ansızın düşmek, birden azalmak, tepe taklak olmak…
in Polish (gwałtownie) spadać…
in Spanish caer en picado…
in Vietnamese lao thẳng xuống…
in Portuguese precipitar-se, cair velozmente…
in Thai ตกฮวบลง…
in German stürzen…
in Catalan caure en picat…
in Japanese (数値が)急落する…
in Chinese (Simplified) 暴跌,急剧下降…
in Indonesian jatuh…
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“plummet” in Business English

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