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Meaning of “poach” in the English Dictionary

"poach" in British English

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poachverb

uk   /pəʊtʃ/ us   /poʊtʃ/
  • poach verb (TAKE)

[I or T] to catch and kill animals without permission on someone else's land: The farmer claimed that he shot the men because they were poaching on his land.
[T] to take and use for yourself unfairly or dishonestly something, usually an idea, that belongs to someone else: Jeff always poaches my ideas, and then pretends that they're his own.
[T] disapproving to persuade someone who works for someone else to come and work for you: They were furious when one of their best managers was poached by another company.
(Definition of poach from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"poach" in American English

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poachverb

us   /poʊtʃ/
  • poach verb (COOK)

[T] to cook something in water or another liquid that is almost boiling: poached eggs
  • poach verb (TAKE ILLEGALLY)

[I/T] to catch or kill an animal without permission on someone else’s property, or to kill animals illegally to get valuable parts of them: [T] Anybody you see with a piece of ivory has poached it. [I] Foreign fishing boats were caught poaching offshore.
poacher
noun [C] us   /ˈpoʊ·tʃər/
(Definition of poach from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"poach" in Business English

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poachverb [I or T]

uk   /pəʊtʃ/ us  
disapproving HR, COMMERCE to persuade employees or customers of another company to become your employees or customers instead: poach sb from sth The company is considering a nationwide expansion after poaching a new chief operating officer from a rival restaurant group.poach staff He is suing the rival company for damages of about £35m after they poached 27 staff from him earlier this year.poach clients/customers Such data should help newcomers to poach customers from existing companies.
to take ideas that belong to another person, company, etc. and use them for yourself, especially in a secret and dishonest way: Several unscrupulous IT companies are offering 'free' seminars on e-commerce to customers and then quietly poaching ideas.
poach talent
HR to persuade very able and skilled employees from another organization to come and work for you: Rival brokers have been sniffing around in a bid to poach talent.
poaching
noun [U]
(Definition of poach from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“poach” in British English

“poach” in American English

“poach” in Business English

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Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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