Meaning of “pole” in the English Dictionary

"pole" in British English

See all translations

polenoun [ C ]

uk /pəʊl/ us /poʊl/

pole noun [ C ] (STICK)

C2 a long, thin stick of wood or metal, often used standing straight up in the ground to support things:

A flag fluttered from a 40-foot pole.

More examples

  • This totem pole is carved from a single tree trunk.
  • These poles will be easier to carry if we lash them together with a rope.
  • I gave the poles a slight wobble and the whole tent collapsed.
  • The vine twines round the pole.
  • The children of the village dance around a pole decorated with coloured ribbons.

Idiom(s)

Polenoun [ C ]

uk /pəʊl/ us /poʊl/

(Definition of “pole” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"pole" in American English

See all translations

polenoun [ C ]

us /poʊl/

pole noun [ C ] (STICK)

a long, usually round, piece of wood or metal, often used to support something:

a telephone pole
a tent pole

pole noun [ C ] (PLACE)

either of the two points at the most northern and most southern ends of the earth or another planet, around which the planet turns:

the North/South Pole

pole noun [ C ] (ELECTRICITY)

either of the two ends of a magnet or two parts of a battery (= device that produces electricity) which have opposite charges

(Definition of “pole” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)