pound Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “pound” in the English Dictionary

"pound" in British English

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poundnoun [C]

uk   us   /paʊnd/

pound noun [C] (MONEY)

A2 (symbol £) the ​standardunit of ​money used in the UK and some other ​countries: a one-pound/two-pound ​coin There are one hundred ​pence in a pound. They ​stolejewelleryvalued at £50,000 (= 50,000 pounds). "Do you have any ​change?" "Sorry, I only have a five-pound note.the pound (symbol £) the ​value of the UK pound, used in ​comparing the ​values of different ​types of ​money from around the ​world: The ​devaluation of the pound will make British ​goods more ​competitiveabroad. On the ​foreignexchanges the pound ​rose two ​cents against the ​dollar to $1.52.
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pound noun [C] (WEIGHT)

B2 (written abbreviation lb) a ​unit for ​measuringweight: One pound is ​approximatelyequal to 454 ​grams. One ​kilogram is ​roughly the same as 2.2 lbs. There are 16 ​ounces in one pound. Ann's ​babyweighed eight and a ​half pounds at ​birth.
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poundverb [I or T]

uk   us   /paʊnd/
B2 to ​hit or ​beatrepeatedly with a lot of ​force, or to ​crush something by ​hitting it ​repeatedly: I could ​feel my ​heart pounding as I went on ​stage to ​collect the ​prize. Nearly 50 ​people are still ​missing after the ​storm pounded the ​coast. The ​city was pounded torubble during the ​war. He pounded on the ​doordemanding to be ​let in. She was pounding away on her ​typewriter until four in the ​morning.
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Phrasal verbs
(Definition of pound from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"pound" in American English

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poundnoun [C]

 us   /pɑʊnd/

pound noun [C] (WEIGHT)

(abbreviation lb., symbol #) a ​unit of ​measurement of ​weightequal to 0.453 ​kilogram

pound noun [C] (PLACE)

a ​place where ​pets that are ​lost or not ​wanted are ​kept: We got this ​mutt at the pound.

pound noun [C] (MONEY)

(symbol £) the ​standardunit of ​money in the ​United Kingdom and some other ​countries

poundverb [I/T]

 us   /pɑʊnd/

pound verb [I/T] (HIT)

to ​hitrepeatedly with ​force, or to ​crush by ​hittingrepeatedly: [T] The ​speaker pounded his ​fists on the ​table. [I] Waves were pounding at the ​rocks. If ​yourheart pounds, it ​beats very ​strongly: [I] My ​heart was still pounding after we ​nearlycrashed on the Interstate.
(Definition of pound from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"pound" in Business English

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poundnoun [C]

uk   us   /paʊnd/ MONEY
( written abbreviation £) MONEY the ​standardunit of ​currency in the UK and some other countries: The ​group has ​assets of about 120 million pounds. The ​company has ​lost hundreds of thousands of pounds of ​investors' ​money. a ten-pound ​note
( written abbreviation lb) MEASURES a ​unit for ​measuringweight, ​equal to 16 ​ounces or 0.454 of a ​kilogram: September copper ​rose 0.85 ​cents to 135.30 ​cents a pound.
(Definition of pound from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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