Meaning of “predictable” in the English Dictionary

"predictable" in British English

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predictableadjective

uk /prɪˈdɪk.tə.bəl/ us /prɪˈdɪk.tə.bəl/

B2 Something that is predictable happens in a way or at a time that you know about before it happens:

Comets appear at predictable times.
Opposite

disapproving happening or behaving in a way that you expect and not unusual or interesting:

The ending to the film was just so predictable.

More examples

  • a predictable plot line
  • The film's plot is predictable and the acting is mediocre.
  • The film has a boringly predictable ending.
  • He's so predictable!
  • It was a fairly predictable result.

(Definition of “predictable” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"predictable" in American English

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predictableadjective

us /prɪˈdɪk·tə·bəl/

acting or happening in a way that is expected:

Comets usually appear at predictable times.
She’s so predictable – she always wants to go to the same old restaurant.
predictability
noun [ U ] /prɪˌdɪk·təˈbɪl·ət̬·i/

Can the predictability of these results be improved?
predictably
adverb us /prɪˈdɪk·tə·bli/

Predictably, the movie was a hit.

(Definition of “predictable” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"predictable" in Business English

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predictableadjective

uk /prɪˈdɪktəbl/ us

happening as or when expected:

Bonds are attractive for investors seeking predictable returns on their investments.
predictably
adverb

The supermarket announced another predictably strong performance.

(Definition of “predictable” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)