Meaning of “present” in the English Dictionary

"present" in English

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presentnoun

uk /ˈprez.ənt/ us /ˈprez.ənt/

present noun (SOMETHING GIVEN)

A2 [ C ] UK informal prezzie, or pressie, something that you are given, without asking for it, on a special occasion, especially to show friendship, or to say thank you:

They gave me theatre tickets as a present.

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present noun (NOW)

the present B1 [ S ]

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the period of time that is happening now, not the past or the future:

That's all for the present.
The play is set in the present.
See also
the present (tense)

A1 [ S ] language the form of the verb that is used to show what happens or exists now:

The verb in this sentence is in the present.
at present B1 formal

now:

"Are you busy?" "Not at present."
At present she's working abroad.

presentadjective

uk /ˈprez.ənt/ us /ˈprez.ənt/

present adjective (IN A PLACE)

B1 [ after verb ] in a particular place:

The whole family was present.
There were no children present.

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present adjective (NOW)

[ before noun ] happening or existing now:

I don't have her present address.
Please state your present occupation and salary.

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presentverb [ T ]

uk /prɪˈzent/ us /prɪˈzent/

present verb [ T ] (GIVE)

B2 to give, provide, or make something known:

The winners were presented with medals.
The letter presented the family with a problem that would be difficult to solve.
The documentary presented us with a balanced view of the issue.
He presented the report to his colleagues at the meeting.
The classroom presented a cheerful busy atmosphere to the visitors (= appeared to them to have this).
The school is presenting (= performing) "West Side Story" as its end-of-term production.

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present verb [ T ] (INTRODUCE)

B2 UK to introduce a television or radio show:

She presents the late-night news.

formal to introduce a person:

May I present Professor Carter?
Later on I'd like to present you to the headteacher.
present yourself

to arrive somewhere and introduce yourself:

He presented himself at the doctor's at 9.30 a.m. as arranged.
present itself C2

If something presents itself, it happens:

An opportunity suddenly presented itself.

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(Definition of “present” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"present" in American English

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presentnoun

us /ˈprez·ənt/

present noun (SOMETHING GIVEN)

[ C ] something that is given without being asked for, esp. on a special occasion or to say thank you; a gift:

Did you wrap the present?

present noun (NOW)

[ U ] this period of time, not the past or the future; now:

The story moves back and forth between the past and the present.

presentadjective [ not gradable ]

us /ˈprez·ənt/

present adjective [ not gradable ] (GRAMMAR)

specialized (in grammar) having the tense of a verb used to describe actions, events, or states that are happening or existing at this time:

Her book is written entirely in the present tense.

present adjective [ not gradable ] (GRAMMAR)

grammar having the tense of a verb used to describe actions, events, or states that are happening or existing at this time:

Her book is written entirely in the present tense.

present adjective [ not gradable ] (PLACE)

in a particular place:

The mayor was present during the entire meeting.

presentverb [ T ]

us /prɪˈzent/

present verb [ T ] (PROVIDE)

to give, show, provide, or make known:

The mayor presented five firefighters with medals for saving people’s lives.
Two clubs in the neighborhood present jazz on Thursdays.
Dr. Gottlieb will present her research in a series of lectures this spring.

If you present yourself, you go to someone or make yourself known to someone:

Paul Groncki presented himself to the receptionist on the 41st floor.

If something presents itself, it happens or takes place:

An opportunity suddenly presented itself.

present verb [ T ] (CAUSE)

to cause something:

Falling tax revenues present a problem for the city.

present verb [ T ] (INTRODUCE)

fml to introduce a person:

I’m pleased to present my son, Charles.

(Definition of “present” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"present" in Business English

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presentverb [ T ]

uk /prɪˈzent/ us

to offer your thoughts, ideas, plans, etc., to others for them to consider:

He will present a detailed explanation of the new sales campaign at the next meeting.

to give a bill, cheque, document, etc., to someone:

Today a store scans your goods, and you simply present your credit card and sign your name.
present sb with sth Organizers presented her with a check for $25,000.
present sth to sb We presented our passports to the customs officer.

if someone or something presents a problem, opportunity, etc., they create it:

The shake-out in bank shares may well have presented an opportunity for bargain hunters.
be presented with sth He was presented with a tough choice.

(Definition of “present” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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present

The present statement is therefore a step in the right direction, albeit only the first of what need to be quite a few such steps.
There is a fundamental need to launch training offensives in order to eliminate the shortage of skilled labour which is used to justify the present state of affairs.
At present, the aid organisations are severely hampered in their work by the insecurity which prevails in the northern and eastern provinces of the country.
Correct regulation of their situation is not only a present matter of justice, but it could prevent the maintenance of the high poverty rate among older women in the future.
At present, one in three flights is delayed and 450 000 flight hours are lost annually, and unless far-reaching measures are taken, the situation will only get worse.
We need to rethink and recognise that water is our most important asset and that our responsibility towards it goes far beyond the present generation.
In making these efforts, the rapporteur has, for his part, done everything within his power to present a proper report on the regulation.
They will have far less chance of success in life and the conditions are all present for their children to experience the same situation.
In order to keep pace with the present breakneck speed at which technology is developing, it is not only desirable but essential to keep the dialogue going.
In its unaltered form, the present directive could, in fact, have very unfortunate and long-term consequences for the environment and for our drinking water.