primary Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “primary” in the English Dictionary

"primary" in British English

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primaryadjective

uk   /ˈpraɪ.mə.ri/  us   /-mɚ.i/

primary adjective (MAIN)

B2 more ​important than anything ​else; ​main: The ​Red Cross's primary ​concern is to ​preserve and ​protecthumanlife. The primary ​responsibilitylies with those who ​break the ​law.
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primary adjective (EDUCATION)

B1 [before noun] of or for the ​teaching of ​youngchildren, ​especially those between five and eleven ​yearsold: primary ​education a primary school

primary adjective (EARLIEST)

happening first: the primary ​stages of ​development

primarynoun [C]

uk   /ˈpraɪ.mə.ri/  us   /-mɚ.i/
in the US, an ​election in which ​peoplechoose who will ​represent a ​particularparty in an ​election for ​politicaloffice
(Definition of primary from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"primary" in American English

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primaryadjective [not gradable]

 us   /ˈprɑɪ·mer·i, -mə·ri/

primary adjective [not gradable] (MOST IMPORTANT)

more ​important than anything ​else; ​main: The primary ​goal of the ​spaceflight was to ​recover a ​satellite.

primary adjective [not gradable] (IN EDUCATION)

relating to the first ​part of a child’s ​education: the primary ​grades

primary adjective [not gradable] (EARLIEST)

happening first: the primary ​stages of development

primarynoun [C]

 us   /ˈprɑɪ·mer·i, -mə·ri/

primary noun [C] (ELECTION)

politics & government an ​election in which ​people who ​belong to a ​politicalpartychoose who will ​represent that ​party in an ​election for ​politicaloffice
(Definition of primary from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"primary" in Business English

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primaryadjective

uk   /ˈpraɪməri/  us   /ˈpraɪmeri/
more important than anything else: primary concern/consideration/focus When ​oilpricesstarted to ​risesharply, the primary ​concern of ​financialmarkets was the possibility of ​inflation. Newspapers have been the primary ​source of ​news for many ​people for many ​years. The ​CEO has primary ​responsibility for making ​day-to-dayinvestment decisions for each ​fund. primary ​goal/​objective/​purpose
FINANCE, STOCK MARKET used to describe ​shares, ​bonds, etc. at the ​time they are first made ​available, rather than when they are ​traded later: A ​combination of ​factorspoint to a ​rise in primary ​trading that will ​providelucrativeopportunities for new ​bonddealers.
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(Definition of primary from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “primary”
in Arabic أساسي…
in Korean 주된, 주요한…
in Portuguese primordial…
in Catalan principal…
in Japanese 最も重要な, 主要な…
in Chinese (Simplified) 最重要的, 首要的, 主要的…
in Turkish ana, temel, asıl…
in Russian основной, главный…
in Chinese (Traditional) 最重要的, 首要的, 主要的…
in Italian principale…
in Polish podstawowy…
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