Meaning of “proactive” in the English Dictionary

"proactive" in British English

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proactiveadjective

uk /ˌprəʊˈæk.tɪv/ us /ˌproʊˈæk.tɪv/

(Definition of “proactive” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"proactive" in American English

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proactiveadjective

also pro-active us /proʊˈæk·tɪv/

intending or intended to produce a good result or avoid a problem, rather than waiting until there is a problem:

The agency decided to take a proactive approach to better serve its clients.

(Definition of “proactive” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"proactive" in Business English

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proactiveadjective

uk /ˌprəʊˈæktɪv/ us

taking action to make changes yourself rather than reacting to things that happen:

Making senior executives more accountable will also make them more proactive.
a proactive approach/role/stance
proactive in doing sth The insurance industry should be more proactive in dealing with the increasing problem of insurance fraud.
proactive about sth "Employees need to be proactive about their workplace rights," said one union official.
proactively
adverb /ˌprəʊˈæktɪvli/

Stakeholders should proactively discuss an organization's goals and objectives.

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(Definition of “proactive” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)