produce Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “produce” in the English Dictionary

"produce" in British English

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produceverb [T]

uk   /prəˈdjuːs/  us   /-ˈduːs/
  • produce verb [T] (MAKE)

B1 to make something or ​bring something into ​existence: France produces a ​greatdeal of ​wine for ​export. Redbloodcells are produced in the ​bonemarrow. She ​works for a ​company that produces (= makes for ​sale)electricalgoods. I was ​wondering whether I could produce a ​meal out of what's ​left in the ​fridge. She's ​asked me to produce a ​report on the ​state of the ​project. When ​animals produce ​young, they give ​birth to them: Our ​cat produced four ​kittens during the ​course of the ​night.humorous All ​ourfriendsseem to be ​busy producing ​offspring at the ​moment.

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  • produce verb [T] (CAUSE)

B2 to ​cause a ​reaction or ​result: The senator's ​speech produced an ​angryresponse from the ​opposition. Her ​remarks produced an ​awkwardsilence. If used on ​delicateskin, this ​cream may produce a ​stingingsensation.

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  • produce verb [T] (FILM/MUSIC)

to ​organize the ​practical and ​financialmattersrelating to the ​preparation of a ​film, ​play, or ​television or ​radioprogramme
Compare
to be in ​charge of making a ​musicalrecording and to be ​responsible for the ​arrangement of the ​music, the ​combination of the different ​instruments or ​voices and the ​generalsound of it
  • produce verb [T] (BRING OUT)

C1 to ​bring something out from ​somewhere and show it: He produced a ​letter from his ​desk that he ​asked me to ​read. One of the men ​suddenly produced a ​knife from his ​pocket.

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producenoun [U]

uk   /ˈprɒd.juːs/  us   /ˈprɑː.djuːs/
(Definition of produce from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"produce" in American English

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produceverb [T]

 us   /prəˈdus/
  • produce verb [T] (MAKE)

to ​create something or ​bring into ​existence: Bukowski produced ​poetry and ​novels. Dairy ​goods and ​beef are produced ​locally.
  • produce verb [T] (ORGANIZE A SHOW)

to ​organize the ​financial and other ​practicalmattersconnected with the making of a ​movie, ​play, ​television show, or other ​entertainmentprogram: He produced a ​couple of ​wonderfulfilms.
  • produce verb [T] (BRING OUT)

to ​bring something out and show it: He ​walked up and produced his ​passport.
  • produce verb [T] (CAUSE)

to ​cause a ​reaction or ​result: Too much ​coffee can produce ​unwanted side-effects.

producenoun [U]

 us   /ˈprɑd·us, ˈproʊ·dus/
  • produce noun [U] (FOOD)

food that is ​grown or ​raised through ​farming, esp. ​fruits and ​vegetables: local produce
(Definition of produce from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"produce" in Business English

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produceverb [T]

uk   /prəˈdjuːs/  us   /prəˈduːs/ PRODUCTION
to make or ​grow something to be ​sold: Foreign-owned ​companies now produce a ​quarter of our ​manufacturingoutput. Unlike ethanol made from corn, not a ​drop of cellulosic ethanol is being commercially produced.
See also
to make a particular thing ​happen: The ​arrival of ​competition in the ​telecomsindustry produced a ​surge of ​talent and ​innovation.
to ​organize the practical and ​financialarrangements for a film, ​televisionprogramme, etc.: He produced several current-affairs ​programmes before being ​appointed Chairman of the ​channel.
to ​provide something to be ​examined: Consultants produced a ​reportrecommending that 1,200 ​posts be ​cut.

producenoun [U]

uk   /ˈprɒdjuːs/  us   /prəˈduːs/ PRODUCTION
food that has been ​grown on a ​farm, especially to be ​sold: dairy/fresh/​organic produce
(Definition of produce from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“produce” in Business English

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