profession Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “profession” in the English Dictionary

"profession" in British English

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professionnoun

uk   us   /prəˈfeʃ.ən/

profession noun (WORK)

B1 [C, + sing/pl verb] any ​type of ​work that ​needsspecialtraining or a ​particularskill, often one that is ​respected because it ​involves a high ​level of ​education: He ​left the ​teaching profession in 1965 to ​start his own ​business. The ​reportnotes that 40 ​percent of ​lawyers entering the profession are women. Teaching as a profession is very ​underpaid. He's a ​doctor by profession.B2 [C, + sing/pl verb] the ​people who do a ​particulartype of ​work, ​considered as a ​group: There's a ​feeling among the ​nursing profession that ​theirwork is ​undervalued.the professions jobs that need ​specialtraining and ​skill, such as being a ​doctor or ​lawyer, but not ​work in ​business or ​industry
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profession noun (STATEMENT)

[C] a ​statement about what someone ​feels, ​believes, or ​intends to do, often made ​publicly: The ​energycompanies' professions ofcommitment to the ​environmentseem less ​believable every ​day. his professions of ​love
(Definition of profession from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"profession" in American English

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professionnoun

 us   /prəˈfeʃ·ən/
[C/U] any ​type of ​work, esp. one that ​needs a high ​level of ​education or a ​particularskill: [C] the ​medical/​teaching profession [U] I’m a ​writer by profession.
(Definition of profession from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"profession" in Business English

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professionnoun [C]

uk   us   /prəˈfeʃən/
a ​job that ​needs a high ​level of ​education or ​specialtraining: What is it like to ​work in a profession where more than 97% of your ​colleagues are men? theaccountancy/teaching/​engineering profession thelegal/​medical/​actuarial professionsb is sth by profession He's an ​architect by profession. She is a ​leadingcommerciallawyer who is ​highly respected within the profession.enter/go into/leave a profession We won't get ​people to ​enter a profession that doesn't ​rewardeffectiveness.
the ​people who do a particular ​type of ​work, considered as a ​group: There's a ​feeling among the nursing profession that their ​work is ​undervalued.
the professions jobs that need ​specialtraining and ​skill, such as being a ​doctor or ​lawyer, rather than ​jobs in ​business or ​industry: The ​struggle for ​equality in the military is not over yet, but women are making significant ​gains in this ​area, as they are inbusiness, ​politics, and the professions.enter/go into the professions It was an ​environment where ​science was a ​dirty word and his ​fellow pupils were encouraged to go into the professions.
(Definition of profession from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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