progress Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “progress” in the English Dictionary

"progress" in British English

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progressnoun [U]

uk   /ˈprəʊ.ɡres/  us   /ˈprɑː-/
B1 movement to an ​improved or more ​developedstate, or to a ​forwardposition: Technological progress has been so ​rapid over the last few ​years. I'm not making much progress with my ​Spanish. The ​doctor said that she was making good progress (= getting ​better after a ​medicaloperation or ​illness). The ​recentfreeelectionsmark the next ​step in the country's progress towardsdemocracy. The yacht's ​crew said that they were makingrelativelyslow progress.in progress B2 formal happening or being done now: Repair ​work is in progress on the south-bound ​lane of the ​motorway and will ​continue until ​June.
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progressverb [I]

uk   us   /prəˈɡres/
B2 to ​improve or ​develop in ​skills, ​knowledge, etc.: My ​Spanish never really progressed beyond the ​stage of being ​able to ​orderdrinks at the ​bar.
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C2 to ​continuegradually: As the ​war progressed, more and more ​countriesbecameinvolved. We ​started off ​talking about the ​weather and ​gradually the ​conversation progressed topolitics.
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(Definition of progress from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"progress" in American English

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progressnoun [U]

 us   /ˈprɑɡ·rəs, -res/
movement toward an ​improved or more ​developedstate, or to a ​forwardposition: The ​talksfailed to make any progress toward a ​settlement.in progress If something is in progress, it is ​happening or being done now: The ​constructionwork is already in progress.

progressverb [I]

 us   /prəˈɡres/
to move toward an ​improved or more ​developedstate, or to a ​forwardposition: Construction is progressing well. As the ​game progressed I was ​bouncing in my ​chair.
progression
noun [U]  us   /prəˈɡreʃ·ən/
The show ​examines one woman’s progression from ​youth to ​oldage.
(Definition of progress from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"progress" in Business English

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progressnoun [U]

uk   /ˈprəʊɡres/  us   /ˈprɒɡres/
the ​process of ​changing or ​developing towards an ​improvedsituation or ​condition: The ​managers were very pleased with the team's progress. "We're ​addressing the problem," he said, "and I ​think we're making progress."progress on sth We are making progress on ​improving our ​corebusiness. "There is no doubt we are making progress towards the ​goal," said Ford's ​CEO.

progressverb [I]

uk   /prəʊˈɡres/  us   /ˈprɒɡres/
to ​develop or ​change to an ​improvedsituation or ​condition: As things progressed in my ​career, I ​realized that ​starting my own ​company was a possibility.progress toward(s)/to sth We are progressing toward more significant ​environmentallegislation.progress beyond sth The ​onlineauctioncompany has ​failed to progress beyond a ​marketshare of 30% in Switzerland.progress rapidly/quickly/steadily She progressed ​steadily through the ​ranks to upper ​management.
(Definition of progress from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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