Meaning of “propose” in the English Dictionary

"propose" in British English

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proposeverb

uk /prəˈpəʊz/ us /prəˈpoʊz/

propose verb (SUGGEST)

B2 [ T ] to offer or suggest a possible plan or action for other people to consider:

[ + that ] I propose that we wait until the budget has been announced before committing ourselves to any expenditure.
[ + -ing verb ] He proposed dealing directly with the suppliers.
She proposed a boycott of the meeting.
He proposed a motion that the chairman resign.

[ T ] to suggest someone for a position in, or as a member of, an organization:

To be nominated for union president you need one person to propose you and another to second you.

B2 [ I ] to ask someone to marry you:

I remember the night your father proposed to me.
propose a toast

to ask people at a formal social occasion to express their good wishes or respect for someone by holding up their glasses, usually of alcohol, at the same time and then drinking from them:

Now, if you'd all please raise your glasses, I'd like to propose a toast to the bride and groom.

More examples

  • Someone proposed a motion to increase the membership fee to £500 a year.
  • Critics of the president have been pouring scorn on the plan ever since it was first proposed.
  • Now, if you'd all please raise your glasses, I'd like to propose a toast to the bride and groom.
  • She proposes an exchange of contracts at two o'clock.
  • What the government is proposing encroaches on the rights of individuals.
proposed
adjective uk /prəˈpəʊzd/ us /prəˈpoʊzd/

Examples

  • They called a demonstration to protest against proposed job cuts.
  • The proposed new exam system has been vigorously opposed by teachers.
  • There is a lot of opposition to the proposed changes.
  • The proposed reforms include making secondary education compulsory up to the age of 18.
  • The survey found a wide spread of opinion over the proposed new building.

B2

There have been huge demonstrations against the proposed factory closure.

(Definition of “propose” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"propose" in American English

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proposeverb

us /prəˈpoʊz/

propose verb (SUGGEST)

to suggest or state (a possible plan or action) for consideration:

[ + to infinitive ] She proposed to keep the schools open all summer.
[ + that clause ] It has often been proposed that the president be elected by direct popular vote.

If you propose to someone, you ask that person to marry you:

[ I ] She felt sure he was going to propose.

propose verb (INTEND)

fml to intend to do something:

[ + to infinitive ] How do you propose to complete the project in such a short time?

(Definition of “propose” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"propose" in Business English

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proposeverb [ T ]

uk /prəˈpəʊz/ us

to give someone a plan or idea to consider:

She proposed a tax reform designed to make basic insurance more affordable.
propose to do sth He is proposing to reduce the government's inflation target from 2.5% to 2%.
propose doing sth They have proposed building a development of small, eco-friendly houses.
propose that He proposed that the trade authorities get together to try to resolve the issue.

MEETINGS to suggest someone for a position or as a member of an organization:

To be nominated as chairman, you need one person to propose you and another to second you.

MEETINGS to formally suggest an idea at a meeting, and ask people to vote on it:

He proposed a motion that the chairman resign.
Compare
propose to do sth

to intend to do something:

How do you propose to complete the project in such a short time scale?
proposed
adjective

Department administrators presented the council with the proposed changes to the tax break program.

(Definition of “propose” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)