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Meaning of “prospect” in the English Dictionary

"prospect" in British English

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prospectnoun

uk   /ˈprɒs.pekt/ us   /ˈprɑː.spekt/
  • prospect noun (POSSIBILITY)

B2 [C or U] the possibility that something good might happen in the future: Is there any prospect of the weather improving? There seems little prospect of an end to the dispute. [+ that] There's not much prospect that this war will be over soon. There's every prospect of success.
prospects B2 [plural]
the possibility of being successful, especially at work: She's hoping the course will improve her career prospects. Prospects of/for (= opportunities for) employment remain bleak for most people in the area.
C2 [S] the idea of something that will or might happen in the future: The prospect of spending three whole days with her fills me with horror. I'm very excited at the prospect of seeing her again. We face the prospect of having to start all over again.
[C] a person who might be chosen, for example as an employee: We'll be interviewing four more prospects for the jobs this afternoon.

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  • prospect noun (VIEW)

[C] formal a good view of a large land area or of a city: From the restaurant there was a marvellous prospect of/over the valley and the mountains beyond.

prospectverb [I]

uk   /ˈprɒs.pekt/ us   /ˈprɑː.spekt/
to search for gold, oil, or other valuable substances on or under the surface of the earth: to prospect for oil/gold
prospector
noun [C] uk   /prəˈspek.tər/ us   /prəˈspek.t̬ɚ/
a prospector looking for gold
(Definition of prospect from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"prospect" in American English

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prospectnoun [C/U]

us   /ˈprɑs·pekt/
  • prospect noun [C/U] (POSSIBILITY)

the possibility or likelihood that something will happen: [C] Losing the elections is a prospect that still appears unlikely. [U] She smiled at the prospect of seeing him again. [pl] Prospects (= Chances for success) in the computer industry are excellent.

prospectverb [I]

us   /ˈprɑs·pekt/
  • prospect verb [I] (SEARCH)

to search for gold, oil, or other valuable substances on or under the surface of the earth
prospector
noun [C] us   /ˈprɑsˌpek·tər/
a prospector searching for gold
(Definition of prospect from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"prospect" in Business English

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prospectnoun

uk   /ˈprɒspekt/ us  
[C or U] the possibility that something might happen in the future, especially something good: there is little/no prospect of sth There is little prospect of the trade embargo being lifted this year. Is there any prospect that serious change in the administration's economic policies could emerge from this session?
prospects
[plural] the possibility of being successful in the future: The market remains sceptical about the bank's prospects.prospects for sth Investors are becoming increasingly excited about prospects for the new drug. The growth prospects of the medical and health care equipment industry are promising.sb's career/job prospects Having a wide range of interests can improve your job prospects. business/economic/financial prospects
in prospect formal
likely to happen in future: Another rise in interest rates is in prospect.
[S] the fact that something might or will happen in the future: The company faces the prospect of a new competitor entering the market with a better offer. These sanctions raise the prospect of a damaging Pacific trade war.
[C] MARKETING a possible future customer: Frequently, a salesperson has only a limited amount of time for contact with customers and prospects.
[C] HR a person who might be chosen as an employee: a prospect for sth We will interview four more prospects for the post this afternoon.
[C] someone or something that is likely to succeed in the future: This product was clearly a better prospect for advertisers.

prospectverb [I]

uk   /ˈprɒspekt/ us  
NATURAL RESOURCES to search for gold, oil, or other valuable substances on or under the surface of the Earth: prospect for sth The company will begin prospecting for diamonds in northwest Russia under a new joint venture.
to try to achieve, create, or find something: prospect for sth The internet promises one of the cheapest methods of prospecting for new clients.
(Definition of prospect from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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