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Meaning of “protect” in the English Dictionary

"protect" in British English

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protectverb

uk   /prəˈtekt/  us   /prəˈtekt/
B1 [I or T] to ​keep someone or something ​safe from ​injury, ​damage, or ​loss: clothing that protects you against the ​cold It's ​important to protect ​yourskin from the ​harmfuleffects of the ​sun. Surely the ​function of the ​law is to protect everyone's ​rights. Of ​course the ​company will ​act to protect ​itsfinancialinterests in the ​country if ​warbegins. Patients' ​names have been ​changed to protect ​theirprivacy. Public ​pressure to protect the ​environment is ​strong and ​growing. Vitamin C may ​help protect againstcancer.
[T] If a ​government protects a ​part of ​its country's ​trade or ​industry, it ​helps it by ​taxinggoods from other ​countries.
[T] to ​provide someone with insurance against ​injury, ​damages, etc.

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protected
adjective uk   /prəˈtek.tɪd/  us   /prəˈtek.tɪd/
This ​dolphin is a protected species (= it is ​illegal to ​harm or ​kill them).
(Definition of protect from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"protect" in American English

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protectverb [T]

 us   /prəˈtekt/
to ​keep someone or something ​safe from ​injury, ​damage, or ​loss: He says he was protecting his ​home and ​family. A ​citizens’ ​groupworked to protect ​forestareas.
(Definition of protect from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"protect" in Business English

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protectverb

uk   us   /prəˈtekt/
[I or T] to ​keep someone or something ​safe from ​injury, ​damage, or ​loss: protect sb/sth from sth They ​produce a self-adhesive ​plasticcoverdesigned to protect ​CDs from scratches.protect sb/sth against sth The ​company has been ​ordered to take ​correctiveaction to protect ​consumers against ​high-pressuresalestactics.protect against sth The ​investment does not ​insureprofits or protect against ​losses in a ​decliningmarket.protect sb's interests/investments/rights The ​agreementobliges WTO Members to protect the ​rights, ​includingcopyrights and ​trademarks, of ​citizens of all other Members. This ​material is protected by ​copyright.
[T] ECONOMICS if a ​government protects ​part of its country's ​trade or ​industry, it helps it by ​taxinggoods from other countries or ​limiting the ​amount of ​goods that can be ​imported: Import ​barriers protected the ​fledglingenterprises. a protected ​industry/​market
[I or T] INSURANCE to ​provide someone with ​insurance against ​injury, ​damage, or ​loss: Workers should take out ​insurance, whether to ​cover themselves against a particular illness or to protect their ​income.protect against sth Life ​annuities protect against the ​risk of ​people outliving their ​savings.
(Definition of protect from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“protect” in British English

“protect” in Business English

More meanings of “protect”

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