protest Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “protest” in the English Dictionary

"protest" in British English

See all translations


uk   /ˈprəʊ.test/  us   /proʊˈtest/
[C or U] a ​strongcomplaintexpressingdisagreement, ​disapproval, or ​opposition: Protests have been made/​registered by many ​people who would be ​affected by the ​proposedchanges. A ​formal protest was made by the ​Germanteam abouttheirdisqualification from the ​relayfinal. Conservation ​groups have ​united in protest against the ​planned new ​road.B2 [C] an ​occasion when ​people show that they ​disagree with something by ​standingsomewhere, ​shouting, ​carryingsigns, etc.: a ​public protest against the ​war a ​peaceful/​violent protestunder protest If something is done under protest, it is done ​unwillingly: I only went to the ​meeting under protest.
More examples

protestverb [I or T]

uk   /prəˈtest/  us   /ˈproʊ.test/
B2 to show that you ​disagree with something by ​standingsomewhere, ​shouting, ​carryingsigns, etc.: A ​bigcrowd of ​demonstrators were protesting againstcuts in ​healthspending.especially US Outside, a ​group of ​students were protesting ​researchcuts.B2 to say something ​forcefully or ​complain about something: Lots of ​people protested about the new ​workinghours. They protested ​bitterly totheiremployers, but to no ​avail. [+ that] A ​younggirl was ​crying, protesting that she didn't ​want to ​leave her ​mother. All through the ​trial he protested his innocence (= ​strongly said he was not ​guilty).
More examples
(Definition of protest from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"protest" in American English

See all translations

protestnoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈproʊ·test/
a ​strongcomplaintexpressingdisagreement, ​disapproval, or ​opposition: [U] Three ​boardmemberswalked out of the ​meeting in protest. [C] A protest against ​capitalpunishment was ​heldoutside the ​courthouse. [U] He ​paid the ​tax under protest to ​avoid a ​penalty.

protestverb [I/T]

 us   /prəˈtest, ˈproʊ·test/
to ​expressdisagreement with, ​disapproval of, or ​opposition to something by ​complainingstrongly about it: [I/T] Groups of ​students have been protesting (against) the ​tuitionincrease.
(Definition of protest from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"protest" in Business English

See all translations


uk   us   /ˈprəʊtest/
[C or U] a ​strongcomplaint against something, or the ​act of ​complainingstrongly about it: an angry/big/formal protest The ​chiefexecutive of the ​troubledcompany gave up a £2.8m ​bonuspackage after ​big protest against/at sth He ​resigned in protest at the ​refusal to ​privatise the ​airline. The length of ​directors' ​contractsattracted a storm of protest from ​smallshareholders at last year's ​annualmeeting.
[C] an occasion when ​people show that they ​disagreestrongly with something by ​standing together and shouting and ​carryingsigns, especially on the streets: hold/organize/stage a protest Shareholders ​held protests against the ​takeoverbid outside the Stock Exchange.spark/trigger a protest The ​plan sparked days of street protests. a large/​mass/​peaceful protest a protest ​demonstration/march
under protest if something is done under protest, it is done unwillingly: In the cruise-ship ​industry, some ​companies are ​payingsalestax under protest, and some aren't ​paying at all.


uk   /prəʊˈtest/  us   /prəˈtest/
[I or T] to say or do something to show that you are against something: protest about/at sth Shareholders of the ​telecomscompany are being urged to protest about a £10million ​bonus given to the ​chiefexecutive.protest against sth Local ​entrepreneurs banded together and called a ​strike to protest against an ​increase in ​localtaxes. US protest a ​proposal/decision
to say very forcefully that something is ​true: protest that Industry ​lobbyists protest that the ​charges on ​smallloans would ​drivelenders out of ​business.
(Definition of protest from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of protest?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“protest” in British English

“protest” in American English

“protest” in Business English

Word of the Day


showing no fear of dangerous or difficult things

Word of the Day

Calling occupants of interplanetary craft
Calling occupants of interplanetary craft
by Colin McIntosh,
December 01, 2015
Are you a fan of shows like Doctor Who and Star Trek? Both shows have been around since the 1960s, and, not surprisingly, have generated some of their own vocabulary, some of which has now entered the Cambridge English Dictionary. The phenomenon of fandom, meaning “the state of being a fan of

Read More 

conversational user interface noun
conversational user interface noun
November 30, 2015
a computer interface that provides information to users in normal, conversational speech in response to spoken requests Nearly every major tech company—from Amazon to Intel to Microsoft to Google—is chasing the sort of conversational user interface that Kaplan and his colleagues at PARC imagined decades ago.

Read More