Meaning of “psychological” in the English Dictionary

"psychological" in British English

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psychologicaladjective

uk /ˌsaɪ.kəlˈɒdʒ.ɪ.kəl/ us /ˌsaɪ.kəˈlɑː.dʒɪ.kəl/

B2 relating to the human mind and feelings:

psychological problems
He claims that the constant aircraft noise has a bad psychological effect on the residents.
We are concerned with the physical and psychological well-being of our employees.

(of an illness or other physical problem) caused by worry or sadness:

I suspect his headaches are purely psychological.

[ before noun ] A psychological film or book is one in which there is a lot of attention given to the way people influence each other's behaviour:

a psychological thriller

More examples

psychologically
adverb uk /ˌsaɪ.kəlˈɒdʒ.ɪ.kəl.i/ us /ˌsaɪ.kəˈlɑː.dʒɪ.kəl.i/

B2

psychologically disturbed

(Definition of “psychological” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"psychological" in American English

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psychologicaladjective

us /ˌsɑɪ·kəˈlɑdʒ·ɪ·kəl/

relating to the study of the mind:

psychological testing
Her problems were psychological.

Psychological also means having an effect on or involving the mind:

psychological stress/well-being
Her new novel is a psychological thriller.
psychologically
adverb us /ˌsɑɪ·kəˈlɑdʒ·ɪ·kli/

Gifted children are well-adjusted, popular, and psychologically healthy.

(Definition of “psychological” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"psychological" in Business English

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psychologicaladjective

uk /ˌsaɪkəˈlɒdʒɪkəl/ us

relating to the human mind and feelings:

The experience of being fired has had lasting psychological effects.
The rail disaster had a psychological impact on some investors.

(Definition of “psychological” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)