Meaning of “put sth up” in the English Dictionary

"put sth up" in British English

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put sth up

phrasal verb with put uk /pʊt/ us /pʊt/ verb present participle putting, past tense and past participle put

(RAISE)

B1 to raise something, or to fix something in a raised position:

Why don't you put up your hood/umbrella?
I put my hand up to ask the teacher a question.
I put my hair up (= fastened it into a position on the top of my head) for the wedding.

(MONEY)

B1 mainly UK to increase the price or value of something:

I see they've put up the price of fuel again.

to provide or lend an amount of money for a particular purpose:

The money for the new hospital was put up by an anonymous donor.
His brother has agreed to put up bail for him.

More examples

  • They've put up tax on cigarettes.
  • High demand has put up the price of houses in this area.

(Definition of “put sth up” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"put sth up" in Business English

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put sth up

phrasal verb with put uk /pʊt/ us verb putting, put, put

to provide or lend an amount of money for a particular purpose:

He's looking for an investor to put up €100,000 to market his product.

FINANCE to provide security for a loan:

Many banks expect you to put up your house as loan security.

mainly UK to increase the price or value of something:

We're going to have to put up our hourly rates next year.

to build something:

They're putting up a hotel behind this office.

to fix something in a place for people to see:

Employers will be required to put up workplace posters detailing new wage information and employment rights.

(Definition of “put sth up” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)