question Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “question” in the English Dictionary

"question" in British English

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questionnoun

uk   us   /ˈkwes.tʃən/

question noun (ASKING)

A1 [C] a ​sentence or phrase used to ​find out ​information: The ​police asked me questions all ​day. Why won't you answer my question? "So where is the ​missingmoney?" "That's a good question." (= I don't ​know the ​answer.) There will be a question-and-answer ​session (= a ​period when ​people can ​ask questions) at the end of the ​talk.A2 [C] in an ​exam, a ​problem that ​tests a person's ​knowledge or ​ability: Answer/Do as many questions as you can.
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question noun (PROBLEM)

B2 [C] any ​matter that ​needs to be ​dealt with or ​considered: This raises the question ofteacherpay. What are ​yourviews on the ​climatechange question?B2 [U] doubt or ​confusion: There's no question about (= it is ​certain) whose ​fault it is. Whether ​children are ​reading fewer ​books is open to question (= there is some ​doubt about it). Her ​loyalty is beyond question (= there is no ​doubt about it). There's no question that he's ​guilty.sb/sth in question C2 formal the ​person or thing that is being ​discussed: I ​stayed at ​home on the ​night in question.
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Grammar

questionverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈkwes.tʃən/
B2 to ​ask a ​person about something, ​especiallyofficially: Several men were questioned by ​policeyesterday about the ​burglary. 68 ​percent of those questioned in the ​pollthoughtnoiselevels had ​increased.B2 to ​expressdoubts about the ​value or ​truth of something: I questioned the ​wisdom of taking so many ​pills. [+ question word] Results from a ​study questioned whethertreatment with the ​drug really ​improvedsurvival. She gave me a questioning ​look (= as if she ​wanted an ​answer from me).
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(Definition of question from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"question" in American English

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questionnoun

 us   /ˈkwes·tʃən/

question noun (SOMETHING ASKED)

[C] a word or words used to ​find out ​information: May I ​ask you a ​personal question? Our ​helpline will ​answeryour questions about ​patientcare.

question noun (PROBLEM)

[C/U] a ​matter to be ​dealt with or ​discussed, or a ​problem to be ​solved: [C] Yourarticleraises the question of ​humanrights. [C] It’s ​simply a question of getting ​yourprioritiesstraight. [C] The question is, are they ​telling the ​truth? [U] I was at ​home on the ​night in question. [C/U] In an ​exam, a question is a ​problem that ​tests a person’s ​knowledge: [C] Answer as many questions as you can.

question noun (DOUBT)

[U] doubt or ​uncertainty: He’s ​competent – there’s no question about that. Her ​loyalty is beyond question.

questionverb [T]

 us   /ˈkwes·tʃən/

question verb [T] (ASK)

to use a word or words to ​find out ​information: Mom’s always questioning me about my ​friends. The ​police questioned several men about the ​burglary. If you question something, you ​expressdoubt or ​uncertainty about it: [+ question word] The ​book questions whether ​people today are ​better off than ​theirparents were.
(Definition of question from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"question" in Business English

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questionnoun

uk   us   /ˈkwestʃən/
[C] a sentence or phrase that ​asks for ​information: ask (sb) a question Can I ​ask a question, Gail?answer a question Not one ​assistant correctly answered all the questions they were ​asked.have a question Does anybody have any questions?
[C] a ​subject or problem: We ​return to the question of whether ​pay for ​performance really ​motivatesemployees. One very difficult question is how to ​chargemarketprices for ​energy.
[C, U] a ​feeling of doubt about something: There is some question as to what is the best ​strategy. The ​ethics of some of his ​businessdeals are open to question.raise questions about sth His ​evidenceraised questions about the credibility of a ​key eyewitness.
bring/call sth into question to ​express doubt about something: If somebody ​calls something into question, then let's ​stop and ​review it. to make ​peoplefeel doubt about something: The ​chief executive's popularity has ​sunk to ​levels that ​bring his ​legitimacy into question.
in question that is being discussed: For ​shareholders of the ​company in question the ​idea of a ​takeover must be ​appealing. if something is in question, no-one knows what is going to ​happen to it: The automaker's future remains in question.
out of the question if something is out of the question, it definitely will not or cannot ​happen: A ​payrise is out of the question.

questionverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈkwestʃən/
to ​ask someone questions about something: He does not know why ​authorities decided to question him.question sb about/on sth Employers are not ​legallyallowed to question ​jobcandidates about their ​plans to have children.
to ​express doubts about something: Increasingly, the ​return on huge ​softwareinvestments made to ​improveefficiency was being questioned.
(Definition of question from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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