quite Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “quite” in the English Dictionary

"quite" in British English

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uk   us   /kwaɪt/
B1 completely: The two ​situations are quite different. The ​coloursalmostmatch but not quite. I ​enjoyed her new ​book though it's not quite as good as her last one.UK formal Are you quite ​sure you ​want to go? Quite honestly/​frankly, the ​thought of it ​terrified me.not quite B2 used to ​express that you are not ​certain about something: I don't quite ​know what to say. I didn't quite ​catch what he said. UK used to show ​agreement with someone's ​opinion: "You'd ​think he could ​spare some ​money - he's not ​exactlypoor." "Quite."quite a/some sth used to ​emphasize the ​degree or ​amount of something, or to say that someone or something is ​impressive, ​interesting, or ​unusual: They have been ​working on this for quite some ​time. That's quite a ​beard you've ​grown, ​young man!quite the best, worst, etc. mainly UK formal old-fashioned used for ​emphasis: It was quite the ​worstdinner I have ​ever had.
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quiteadverb, predeterminer

uk   us   /kwaɪt/ UK (US usually fairly, pretty)
A2 a little or a lot but not ​completely: I'm quite ​tired but I can ​certainlywalk a little ​further. There was quite a lot of ​traffic today but ​yesterday was ​evenbusier. It was quite a ​difficultjob. He's quite ​attractive but not what I'd ​callgorgeous. It would be quite a ​nuisance to write to everyone.
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(Definition of quite from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"quite" in American English

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quiteadverb [not gradable]

 us   /kwɑɪt/

quite adverb [not gradable] (VERY)

to a ​largedegree: School is quite different from what it ​once was.quite a Quite a is used before some ​nouns to ​emphasize the ​largenumber, ​amount, or ​size of the ​subject referred to: We’ve had quite a lot of ​rain this ​year. There were quite a few (= a lot) of ​peoplewaiting in ​line. She had quite a ​bit (= a lot) to say to him when he ​finallyshowed up. I hadn’t ​seen Rebecca in quite a while (= for a ​longtime).

quite adverb [not gradable] (COMPLETELY)

completely: Quite ​frankly, the ​thought of ​performingterrifies me. I’m not quite done ​yet. I’m not quite ​sure I ​understand.

quite adverb [not gradable] (REALLY)

really or ​truly: Winning this ​contest was quite an ​accomplishment. It was quite a ​remarkablespeech.
(Definition of quite from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“quite” in British English

“quite” in American English

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