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Meaning of “quite” in the English Dictionary

"quite" in British English

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quiteadverb

uk   /kwaɪt/  us   /kwaɪt/
B1 completely: The two situations are quite different. The colours almost match but not quite. I enjoyed her new book though it's not quite as good as her last one.UK formal Are you quite sure you want to go? Quite honestly/frankly, the thought of it terrified me.
not quite
B2 used to express that you are not certain about something: I don't quite know what to say. I didn't quite catch what he said.
UK used to show agreement with someone's opinion: "You'd think he could spare some money - he's not exactly poor." "Quite."
quite a/some sth
used to emphasize the degree or amount of something, or to say that someone or something is impressive, interesting, or unusual: They have been working on this for quite some time. That's quite a beard you've grown, young man!
quite the best, worst, etc. mainly UK formal old-fashioned
used for emphasis: It was quite the worst dinner I have ever had.

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quiteadverb, predeterminer

uk   /kwaɪt/  us   /kwaɪt/ UK (US usually fairly, pretty)
A2 a little or a lot but not completely: I'm quite tired but I can certainly walk a little further. There was quite a lot of traffic today but yesterday was even busier. It was quite a difficult job. He's quite attractive but not what I'd call gorgeous. It would be quite a nuisance to write to everyone.

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(Definition of quite from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"quite" in American English

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quiteadverb [not gradable]

 us   /kwɑɪt/
to a large degree: School is quite different from what it once was.
quite a
Quite a is used before some nouns to emphasize the large number, amount, or size of the subject referred to: We’ve had quite a lot of rain this year. There were quite a few (= a lot) of people waiting in line. She had quite a bit (= a lot) to say to him when he finally showed up. I hadn’t seen Rebecca in quite a while (= for a long time).
completely: Quite frankly, the thought of performing terrifies me. I’m not quite done yet. I’m not quite sure I understand.
really or truly: Winning this contest was quite an accomplishment. It was quite a remarkable speech.
(Definition of quite from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“quite” in British English

“quite” in American English

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