rate Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “rate” in the English Dictionary

"rate" in British English

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ratenoun [C]

uk   us   /reɪt/

rate noun [C] (MEASURE)

B2 the ​speed at which something ​happens or ​changes, or the ​amount or ​number of ​times it ​happens or ​changes in a ​particularperiod: Although she's ​recovering from her ​illness, her rate ofprogress is ​quiteslow. I told my ​assistants to ​work attheir own rate. The ​taxi was going at a ​tremendous rate. the ​growth/​inflation/​mortality/​unemployment, etc. rate The ​drug has a high success/​failure rate.
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rate noun [C] (PAYMENT)

B2 an ​amount or ​level of ​payment: We ​agreed a rate with the ​painter before he ​startedwork. What's the going (= ​standard) rate for this ​type of ​work? Do you ​payyourmortgage on a fixed or variable rate (= of ​interest)?
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rate noun [C] (TAX)

rates [plural] a ​localtaxpaid in ​Australia, and in ​Britain in the past, by the ​owners of ​houses and other ​buildings

rateverb [T]

uk   us   /reɪt/

rate verb [T] (JUDGE)

C1 to ​judge the ​value or ​character of someone or something: How do you rate him as a ​footballplayer? She is rated very highly by the ​people she ​works for.informal "What do you ​think of her as a ​singer?" "I don't really rate her (= I do not ​think that she is very good)." I rate ​cars as one of the ​worstpolluters of the ​environment. [+ obj + noun ] On a ​scale of one to ten, I'd rate his ​book a five. Traffic ​accidents are so ​frequent that they don't rate a ​mention (= are not ​considered to be ​worthreporting) in the ​newspaperunless a lot of ​people are ​killed. rate as sth to be ​considered to be something of a ​particularquality: That rates as the ​worstfilm I've ​everseen.

rate verb [T] (TAX)

UK In ​Britain in the past, a ​building was rated to ​decide how much ​localtax the ​owner should ​pay.

-ratesuffix

uk   us   /-reɪt/
C1 used with words such as first, second, etc. to show how good you ​think something is: His ​suggestions are always first-​rate (= very good). This ​companyproduces second/third-​rate (= not very good)goods.
(Definition of rate from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"rate" in American English

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ratenoun [C]

 us   /reɪt/

rate noun [C] (MEASUREMENT)

a ​measurement of the ​speed at which something ​happens or ​changes, or the ​number of ​times it ​happens or ​changes, within a ​particularperiod: the rate of ​change/​decay rates of ​digestion/oxygenation We have ​relativelylowunemployment rates these ​days. If we ​improvestudents’ ​self-esteem, we could ​reduce the ​dropout rate.

rate noun [C] (PAYMENT)

an ​amount or ​level of ​payment: Interest rates may ​risesoon. Rental rates ​varydepending on the ​size of the ​car.

rateverb

 us   /reɪt/

rate verb (VALUE)

to ​judge the ​value or ​worth of something: [T] Half of those ​surveyed rated his ​work as good. [L] The ​movie is rated R. [I] Mark Twain has rated as an ​enduringauthor for 100 ​years. disapproving If you say someone or something doesn’t rate, you ​mean the ​person or thing is of ​poorquality or not ​worthconsideration.
(Definition of rate from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"rate" in Business English

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ratenoun [C]

uk   us   /reɪt/
the ​speed at which something ​happens: at a fast/slow/steady rate The ​economygrew at a ​slower rate in the third ​quarter than previously ​estimated.an alarming/incredible/surprising rate The future of the ​channel is under threat after ​losingviewers and advertisers at an alarming rate.cut/reduce/slow down the rate The ​dip in ​consumerspending was a ​keyfactor in ​slowing down the rate of ​growth in the ​economy. double/​increase/​speed up the rate of sth improve/​maintain the rate of sth
the ​amount of something, or the ​number of ​times something ​happens in a particular ​period: at a rate of 20%/100 a day, etc. The group's ​businessplanshows it ​growing at its current rate for the next five ​years.rising/falling rate The ​reportexamines the reasons for the ​rising rate of ​personalbankruptcy.unemployment/jobless rate Economists ​predict that the ​unemployment rate will continue to ​rise over the next 12 months. It is an ​area with high ​poverty and a high crime rate. the birth/death/divorce rate the failure/​success rate
HR, INSURANCE an ​amount of ​money that is ​charged or ​paid for a particular ​service: cheap/competitive/reasonable rate The ​networkoffers the ​cheapest rates for ​mobilecalls from abroad. The ​surveyfound that the ​average rate of ​pay was $9.51 ​per hour for women and $12.95 for men.charge/pay/set a rate We ​charge a rate of between €500 and €800 ​per day. adaily/hourly/​weekly rate
FINANCE, TAX the ​amount that is ​charged as ​tax on ​income, ​interest on ​loans, etc., usually shown as a ​percentage: a competitive/reduced/special rate Some ​internetbanksofferpersonalloans at ​highlycompetitive rates.falling/high/rising rate How much a ​bondfundfalls in a ​rising rate ​environment depends on its ​duration.a fall/rise/cut in the rate We are likely to see a ​rise in the rate of ​VAT. an annual/monthly/​quarterly rate the loan/​savings ratea rate cut/increase/hike I ​think we need another rate ​increase to ​keepinflation down.
rates [plural] TAX, GOVERNMENT in the UK, a ​localtaxpaid for some ​publicservices: The ​company was told it had to ​pay rates of £1,100 a ​year on the ​smallpiece of ​land.

rateverb

uk   us   /reɪt/
[I or T] to have, or be ​thought to have, a particular ​value or ​quality: rate (sth) highly The ​broadbanddeal is rated ​highly in a ​survey by Which ​magazine. The sector's most highly-rated analystteamadvisedinvestors to ​bookprofits.rate (sth) as sth That must rate as one of the worst ​investments the ​company has ever made. be rated a ​failure/​success
[T] to give something a particular ​value or ​position in a ​list, according to a set of ​standards: The ​surveyaskedconsumers to rate the elements that would most ​influence their ​purchasing decision.be rated A/15/R, etc. This film is rated 18, and is for adults only.
[T] COMMERCE, ENVIRONMENT to give something such as a ​piece of ​electricalequipment a ​number or ​letter that ​shows how powerful it is, how much electricity it uses, etc. so that ​consumers can compare ​products: be rated A/B/X, etc. The washing ​machine is rated A for ​energyefficiency.
[T] FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to give an ​investment a particular ​value after ​examining the ​level of ​risk involved: be rated (as) investment grade/A/Triple A etc. Debt rated AA has a very ​strongcapacity to ​payinterest and ​repayprincipal.
rate sth (as) a buy/hold/sell FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to ​adviseinvestors to ​buy, ​keep, or ​sell particular ​shares or ​bonds
See also

-ratesuffix

used with words such as first, second, etc. to show how good or ​bad you ​think something is: first-/top-rate An ​innovativeperson with top-rate ​businesscredentials is needed to ​fill the ​position of ​executivedirector.
(Definition of rate from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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