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Meaning of “raw” in the English Dictionary

"raw" in British English

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rawadjective

uk   /rɔː/  us   /rɑː/
  • raw adjective (NOT COOKED)

B1 (of ​food) not ​cooked: raw ​fish

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  • raw adjective (NOT PROCESSED)

B2 (of ​materials) in a ​naturalstate, without having been through any ​chemical or ​industrialprocess: Oil is an ​important raw material that can be ​processed into many different ​products, ​includingplastics. They ​claimed that raw sewage was being ​pumped into the ​sea.
Raw ​information has been ​collected but has not ​yet been ​studied in ​detail: raw data/​evidence/​figures
used to refer to a ​person who is not ​trained or is without ​experience: I would ​prefer not to ​leave this ​job to John while he's still a raw recruit/​beginner.
Feelings or ​qualities that are raw are ​natural and ​difficult to ​control: We were ​struck by the raw energy/​power of the ​dancers' ​performances. Her ​emotions are still a ​bit raw after her ​painfuldivorce.
A ​piece of writing that is raw is one that does not ​try to ​hide anything about ​itssubject: His new ​play is a raw ​drama about ​familylife.

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  • raw adjective (PAINFUL)

sore or ​painful because of being ​rubbed or ​damaged: The ​shoe had ​rubbed a raw ​place on her ​heel.
rawness
noun [U] uk   /ˈrɔː.nəs/  us   /ˈrɑː.nəs/
(Definition of raw from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"raw" in American English

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rawadjective

 us   //
  • raw adjective (NOT COOKED)

[not gradable] not ​cooked: raw ​fish/​oysters
  • raw adjective (NOT PROCESSED)

[not gradable] not ​processed or ​treated; in ​itsnaturalcondition: raw ​milk raw ​silk Raw ​sewageran in ​ditches along the ​streets of the ​village.
[not gradable] If ​people or ​theirqualities are raw, they have not been ​developed or ​trained: Even when she first ​startedskating, you could ​see the ​determination and the raw ​talent. Alex was just a raw ​recruit when he was ​handed this ​job.
  • raw adjective (SORE)

sore because the ​skin has been ​rubbed or ​damaged
  • raw adjective (COLD)

[not gradable] (of ​weather) ​cold and ​wet: It was a raw, ​wintryday with a ​coldwind.
Idioms
(Definition of raw from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"raw" in Business English

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rawadjective

uk   us   /rɔː/
NATURAL RESOURCES, PRODUCTION used to describe ​materials that are in their ​naturalstate and have not yet been ​changed, prepared, or used to make something else: raw ​ingredients Cotton ​millsbuy the raw cotton and ​turn it into ​finished cloth. Cheese and yogurt ​producers have to ​pay high ​prices for raw ​milk and other ​supplies.
used to describe ​information that has been ​collected, but has not yet been ​studied in detail: We were given a large ​quantity of raw ​data. As yet we are only able to give you the raw ​figures before ​adjustments.
a raw deal
bad or ​unfairtreatment: get/be given a raw deal We are getting a raw ​deal from ​federaltax and ​spendingpolicies.
(Definition of raw from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“raw” in Business English

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