reality Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “reality” in the English Dictionary

"reality" in British English

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uk   /riˈæl.ɪ.ti/  us   /-ə.t̬i/
B2 [S or U] the ​state of things as they are, ​rather than as they are ​imagined to be: The reality of the ​situation is that ​unless we ​find some new ​fundingsoon, the ​youthcentre will have to ​close. He escaped from reality by going to the ​cinema every ​afternoon. He ​seemed very ​young, but he was in reality (= in ​fact)older than all of us.B2 [C] a ​fact: The ​bookconfronts the ​harshsocial and ​political realities of the ​world today. Her ​childhoodambition became a reality (= ​happened in ​fact) when she was made a ​judge.
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(Definition of reality from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"reality" in American English

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realitynoun [C/U]

 us   /riˈæl·ɪ·t̬i/
the ​actualstate of things, or the ​factsinvolved in such a ​state: [U] The reality is I’m not going to be ​picked for the ​team. [C] The realities of ​parenthood were ​overwhelming at reality In reality ​means what ​actuallyhappened or what the ​actualsituation is: He told the ​police he was out of ​town, but in reality, he never went ​anywhere.
(Definition of reality from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “reality”
in Arabic واقِع…
in Korean 현실…
in Portuguese realidade…
in Catalan realitat…
in Japanese 現実…
in Chinese (Simplified) 现实, 实际情况, 事实…
in Turkish gerçek, hakikât…
in Russian действительность…
in Chinese (Traditional) 現實, 實際情況, 事實…
in Italian realtà…
in Polish rzeczywistość…
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