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Meaning of “reason” in the English Dictionary

"reason" in British English

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reasonnoun

uk   /ˈriː.zən/  us   /ˈriː.zən/
  • reason noun (EXPLANATION)

A2 [C or U] the cause of an event or situation or something that provides an excuse or explanation: The reason for the disaster was engine failure, not human error. [+ question word] The reason why grass is green was a mystery to the little boy. [+ (that)] The reason (that) I'm calling is to ask a favour.not standard The reason I walked out was because I was bored. [+ to infinitive] The police have (every good) reason to believe that he is guilty. She was furious, and with reason (= with good cause). For some reason/For reasons best known to himself (= for reasons no one else knows about) he's decided to leave his job.
by reason of formal
because of: He's always asked to these occasions by reason of his position.

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  • reason noun (JUDGMENT)

[U] the ability of a healthy mind to think and make judgments, especially based on practical facts: We humans believe that we are the only animals to have the power of reason.mainly UK old-fashioned He lost his reason (= became mentally ill) when both his parents were killed in the crash.
within reason
C2 within the limits of what is acceptable and possible: We can wear anything we like to the office, within reason.

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reasonverb [T]

uk   /ˈriː.zən/  us   /ˈriː.zən/
(Definition of reason from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"reason" in American English

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reasonnoun

 us   /ˈri·zən/
  • reason noun (EXPLANATION)

[C/U] the cause of an event or situation, or something suggested as an explanation: [C] She had never stopped by before for any reason. [C] There must be a reason why she’s not here yet. [U] Adams had good reason to fire Pickering.
  • reason noun (JUDGMENT)

[U] the ability to think and make judgments, esp. good judgments: Meditation seemed to have improved her ability to reason.

reasonverb

 us   /ˈri·zən/
  • reason verb (JUDGE)

to think about and make a good judgment about: [+ (that) clause] He reasoned (that) he had only four or five years left as an athlete.
  • reason verb (EXPLAIN)

to argue with and try to persuade someone: [I] Grace kept her voice gentle, as if she were reasoning with a child.
reasoning
noun [U]  us   /ˈri·zə·nɪŋ/
I didn’t follow her reasoning.
(Definition of reason from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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