rebound Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “rebound” in the English Dictionary

"rebound" in British English

See all translations

reboundverb [I]

uk   us   /ˌriːˈbaʊnd/

reboundnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈriː.baʊnd/
the ​act of rebounding: I ​hit the ​ball on the rebound (= after it had ​hit the ​wall or ​groundonce). in ​sports, a ​ball or puck (= ​small, round, hard ​object used in ​icehockey) that ​becomesavailable after an ​unsuccessfulattempt to ​score, or an ​occasion when this ​happens in ​basketball, an ​occasion when a ​playersuccessfully gets the ​ball after a shot (= ​attempt to ​score) has been ​missed: Over three ​games he ​averaged 14.0 ​points and 8.7 rebounds.
(Definition of rebound from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"rebound" in American English

See all translations

reboundverb [I]

 us   /ˈri·bɑʊnd, rɪˈbɑʊnd/
to ​return to an ​earlier and ​bettercondition; ​improve: Older ​athletesfind it ​harder to rebound from ​injuries. If a ​ball or other ​object rebounds, it ​bounces back after ​hitting a hard ​surface.
rebound
noun [C/U]  us   /ˈri·bɑʊnd/
[U] The ​artist is on the rebound from his midcareer ​slump.
(Definition of rebound from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"rebound" in Business English

See all translations

reboundverb [I]

uk   us   /rɪˈbaʊnd/
FINANCE if ​prices, ​shares, etc. rebound, they ​increase in ​value again after a ​period when they were going down in ​value: Cotton rebounded from ​declines early in the day to end at a ​higherprice. Shares rebounded 18p to 379p yesterday.rebound from $18/6.5p/2.6% etc. The ​groupposted a ​profit last ​year of $24.8 million, rebounding from a ​loss of $10.9 million the previous ​year. The Dow Jones Industrial Average ​slid as much as 53.64 to 5594.01, before rebounding to 5616.21.
ECONOMICS if an ​economy or a ​businessactivity rebounds, it ​improves after a difficult ​period of ​time: Tourism in the ​region is expected to rebound after last year's disastrous ​oil spill. Consumer ​confidence rebounded ​sharply in July, according to new ​figuresreleased last week.the economy/sales/business rebounds Since the most recent ​downturn, the ​economy has rebounded, with ​unemployment below ​average.rebound from sth Shares have been ​rising for weeks amid ​speculation that the ​market for 18-wheel ​trucks is rebounding from a ​slump.

reboundnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈriːbaʊnd/
ECONOMICS an ​improvement in an ​economy or ​businessactivity after a difficult ​period of ​time: Central ​bankers are still looking for signs of a rebound in a faltering ​economy. The ​groupreported a ​strong rebound inprofitability in the first ​quarter.a rebound from sth Commodities ​markets are ​currentlystaging a rebound from recent ​heavylosses. a sharp/​strong/significant/​small rebound an economic/​technical/​market rebound
be on the rebound to be ​increasing in ​value or ​improving after being ​low or not very good: Sales and ​membership are on the rebound again, since ​registrationprocedures were simplified two ​years ago. February ​spending was on the rebound from a ​depressed January, when ​incomesfell a ​revised 0.5% instead of 0.4% amid severe ​weatherconditions.
(Definition of rebound from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “rebound”
in Spanish rebotar…
in Vietnamese nẩy lại…
in Malaysian melantun…
in Thai สะท้อนกลับ…
in French rebondir…
in German zurückprallen…
in Chinese (Simplified) 弹回, 反弹, 跳回…
in Turkish çarpıp geri gelmek, çarpıp/vurup sekmek…
in Russian отскакивать…
in Indonesian melenting…
in Chinese (Traditional) 彈回, 反彈, 跳回…
in Polish odbijać się…
What is the pronunciation of rebound?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“rebound” in British English

“rebound” in American English

“rebound” in Business English

Word of the Day

drum

a musical instrument, especially one made from a skin stretched over the end of a hollow tube or bowl, played by hitting with the hand or a stick

Word of the Day

I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
by Kate Woodford,
February 10, 2016
On this blog, we like to look at words and phrases in the English language that learners often have difficulty with. Two phrases that can be confused are ‘used to do something’ and ‘be used to something/doing something’. People often use one phrase when they mean the other, or they use the wrong

Read More 

farecasting noun
farecasting noun
February 08, 2016
predicting the optimum date to buy a plane ticket, especially on a website or using an app A handful of new and updated websites and apps are trying to perfect the art of what’s known as farecasting – predicting the best date to buy a ticket.

Read More