rebut Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “rebut” in the English Dictionary

"rebut" in British English

See all translations

rebutverb [T]

uk   us   /rɪˈbʌt/ (-tt-) formal
to ​argue that a ​statement or ​claim is not ​true: She has rebutted ​charges that she has been ​involved in any ​financialmalpractice.
(Definition of rebut from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"rebut" in American English

See all translations

rebutverb [T]

 us   /rɪˈbʌt/ (-tt-) fml
to ​argue that a ​statement or ​claim is not ​true: He ​appeared on TV to rebut the ​charges against him.
(Definition of rebut from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"rebut" in Business English

See all translations

rebutverb [T]

uk   us   /rɪˈbʌt/ (-tt-)
to say firmly and directly, or prove, that something is not ​true: A ​lawyer for the bank's ​CEO said he had been given too little ​time to rebut the report's ​conclusionsahead of a ​boardvote later this week. A ​leading UK ​supermarket has strenuously rebutted ​allegations that it exerts a ​monopoly over the UK's £124bn ​grocerymarket. Economists at the World Bank are rebutting ​claims that ​globalization hurts the ​poor. The Government is attempting to rebut continuing criticism about the ​weight of ​redtape.
(Definition of rebut from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “rebut”
in Chinese (Simplified) 反驳, 驳斥, 驳回…
in Chinese (Traditional) 反駁, 駁斥, 駁回…
What is the pronunciation of rebut?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day

fire-eater

a performer who entertains people by seeming to swallow flames

Word of the Day

I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
by Kate Woodford,
February 10, 2016
On this blog, we like to look at words and phrases in the English language that learners often have difficulty with. Two phrases that can be confused are ‘used to do something’ and ‘be used to something/doing something’. People often use one phrase when they mean the other, or they use the wrong

Read More 

farecasting noun
farecasting noun
February 08, 2016
predicting the optimum date to buy a plane ticket, especially on a website or using an app A handful of new and updated websites and apps are trying to perfect the art of what’s known as farecasting – predicting the best date to buy a ticket.

Read More