reception Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “reception” in the English Dictionary

"reception" in British English

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receptionnoun

uk   /rɪˈsep.ʃən/ us   /rɪˈsep.ʃən/
  • reception noun (WELCOME)

B2 [C] a formal party at which important people are welcomed: The president gave a reception for the visiting heads of state.
C1 [S] the way in which people react to something or someone: Her first book got a wonderful/warm/frosty reception from the critics.
[U] the act of welcoming someone or something: The new hospital was ready for the reception of its first patients.
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expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • reception noun (WELCOME)

B1 [U] the place in a hotel or office building where people go when they first arrive: Ask for me at reception. I signed in at the reception desk.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • reception noun (SIGNALS)

[U] the degree to which mobile phone, radio, or television signals are strong and clear: The phone reception is really bad out here in the woods. We live on top of a hill and so we get excellent radio reception. A new digital antenna might improve your reception.
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(Definition of reception from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"reception" in American English

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receptionnoun

us   /rɪˈsep·ʃən/
  • reception noun (WELCOME)

[C] the way in which people react to something or someone: The proposed jail has received a cool/lukewarm reception from local residents. American musicians found a warm reception in Europe in the 1960s.
[C] A reception is also a formal party: a cocktail/wedding reception
  • reception noun (RADIO/TELEVISION)

[U] the degree to which radio or television sounds and pictures are clear: We get poor reception around here.
(Definition of reception from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"reception" in Business English

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receptionnoun

uk   /rɪˈsepʃən/ us  
[U] WORKPLACE a place inside a hotel or office building where visitors go when they first arrive: Let's meet in reception. Posters will be on display in the reception area. Collect your welcome packs from the reception desk. We need more staff working on reception.
[C] a formal party to welcome someone or to celebrate something: The mayor offered to host a reception for the delegates. The product will be launched at a champagne reception.
[C] the way in which people react to a new idea, product, or person: a warm/cool reception The firm's expansion in Africa is expected to meet with a mixed reception. The latest marketing plan got a frosty reception from the Board.
[U] COMMUNICATIONS the quality of sound and pictures on a radio, television, mobile phone, etc. when it is used in a particular place: I won't be able to call you, as reception is really bad in rural areas.
(Definition of reception from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“reception” in American English

“reception” in Business English

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