recognition Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “recognition” in the English Dictionary

"recognition" in British English

See all translations


uk   us   /ˌrek.əɡˈnɪʃ.ən/

recognition noun (ACCEPTING)

C2 [S or U] agreement that something is ​true or ​legal: It's a new ​country, ​hoping for ​diplomatic recognition from the ​internationalcommunity. [+ that] There's a ​growing recognition that this ​country can no ​longerafford to be a ​nuclearpower.C2 [S or U] If you are given recognition, ​people show ​admiration and ​respect for ​yourachievements: Ella ​complained that the ​company never gave her any recognition for her ​work. He was ​presented with a ​goldwatch in recognition of (= to show ​respect for) his ​years as ​clubsecretary.
More examples

recognition noun (KNOWING)

C2 [U] the ​fact of ​knowing someone or something because you have ​seen or ​heard him or her or ​experienced it before: When he ​returned to his ​hometown after the ​war, he ​found it had changed out of all/beyond all recognition (= it had ​changed so much that he no ​longerrecognized it).
(Definition of recognition from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"recognition" in American English

See all translations

recognitionnoun [U]

 us   /ˌrek·əɡˈnɪʃ·ən/

recognition noun [U] (KNOWLEDGE)

the ​fact of ​knowing who a ​person is or what a thing is because of having ​seen or ​experienced that ​person or thing before: Dole ​obviously had the ​greatestname recognition of all the ​Republicancandidates.

recognition noun [U] (APPRECIATION)

publicappreciation for a person’s or group’s ​achievements: She ​gained recognition as an ​expert in ​energyconservation. Recognition also refers to the ​accepting of something as ​true: Charges were ​dropped in recognition of the ​fact that there ​simply wasn’t enough ​evidence.
(Definition of recognition from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"recognition" in Business English

See all translations

recognitionnoun [U]

uk   us   /ˌrekəɡˈnɪʃən/
MARKETING a ​situation in which ​people know what something is when they see or hear it: After thirty ​years of ​trading, the ​companyname enjoys ​global recognition. We have ​poor brand recognition in the Asian ​market. Skype's ​dominance and name recognition can pose problems for ​competitors.
the ​act of praising or ​rewarding someone for something they have done: We did all the ​work but they got all the recognition! They are to receive ​bonuses in recognition of their ​work.
officialagreement that an ​organization has ​authority to do things: They have been ​trying for three ​years to get recognition for their ​union. The ​councilruns a recognition ​scheme for ​private colleges.
IT the ​ability of a ​machine to read something ​electronically and to get ​information from it: text recognition ​software
(Definition of recognition from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of recognition?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“recognition” in British English

“recognition” in American English

“recognition” in Business English

Word of the Day


a large group of soldiers who form a part of an army, especially the ancient Roman army

Word of the Day

There is no such thing as a true synonym in English. Discuss!
There is no such thing as a true synonym in English. Discuss!
by Kate Woodford,
November 25, 2015
In the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary the word ‘synonym’ is defined as ‘a word or phrase that has the same or nearly the same meaning as another word or phrase in the same language’. As you might expect, definitions for this word are broadly similar in other dictionaries and yet the italicized

Read More 

conversational user interface noun
conversational user interface noun
November 30, 2015
a computer interface that provides information to users in normal, conversational speech in response to spoken requests Nearly every major tech company—from Amazon to Intel to Microsoft to Google—is chasing the sort of conversational user interface that Kaplan and his colleagues at PARC imagined decades ago.

Read More