recoil Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “recoil” in the English Dictionary

"recoil" in British English

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recoilverb [I]

uk   us   /rɪˈkɔɪl/
to ​move back because of ​fear or disgust (= ​dislike or ​disapproval): He ​leanedforward to ​kiss her and she recoiled in ​horror. I recoiled from the ​smell and the ​filth. to ​refuse to ​accept an ​idea or ​principle, ​feelingstrongdislike or ​disapproval: She ​wondered how it would be to ​touch him and recoiled at the ​thought.

recoilnoun [U]

uk   us   /ˈriː.kɔɪl/
the ​suddenbackwardmovement that a ​gun makes when it is fired
(Definition of recoil from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"recoil" in American English

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recoilverb [I]

 us   /rɪˈkɔɪl/
to make a ​suddenmovement away from something esp. because of ​fear or ​disgust: fig. Sun-worshipers might recoil in ​horror at the ​chillingwinds and ​roughseas, but we ​loved the ​place.

recoilnoun [U]

 us   /ˈri·kɔɪl, rɪˈkɔɪl/
the ​sudden, ​backwardmovement that a ​gun makes when it is ​fired
(Definition of recoil from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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