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Meaning of “reform” in the English Dictionary

"reform" in British English

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reformverb [I or T]

uk   /rɪˈfɔːm/  us   /rɪˈfɔːrm/
C2 to make an improvement, especially by changing a person's behaviour or the structure of something: Who will reform our unfair electoral system? For years I was an alcoholic, but I reformed when the doctors gave me six months to live.

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reformation
noun [C or U] uk   /ˌref.əˈmeɪ.ʃən/  us   /ˌref.ɚˈmeɪ.ʃən/
He's undergone something of a reformation - he's a changed man.

reformnoun [C or U]

uk   /rɪˈfɔːm/  us   /rɪˈfɔːrm/
(Definition of reform from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"reform" in American English

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reformverb [I/T]

 us   /rɪˈfɔrm/
social studies to become better, or to make something better by making corrections or removing any faults: [T] As governor, he reformed election procedures. [I] She insists that she has finally reformed.
reform
noun [C/U]  us   /rɪˈfɔrm/
[U] The administration is proposing welfare reform.
reformation
noun [C/U]  us   /ˌref·ərˈmeɪ·ʃən/
[U] reformation of the health care system
reformed
adjective  us   /rɪˈfɔrmd/
I’m a reformed guy – I eat a low-fat diet and exercise every day.
(Definition of reform from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"reform" in Business English

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reformnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /rɪˈfɔːm/
an improvement or set of improvements made to a system, law, organization, etc. in order to make it more modern or effective: reform of sth Essential reform of the banking sector is under way.reforms in sth He has called for reforms in the retirement system for years.banking/economic/tax reform Corporate tax reform has left companies uncertain about future tax bills. Market reforms have opened the doors to greater competition. fundamental/major/radical reforms

reformverb [T]

uk   us   /rɪˈfɔːm/
to make an improvement to a system, a law, an organization, etc., in order to make it more modern or effective: reform the economy/the tax system, etc. Corporation tax will be reformed to raise more revenue.
(Definition of reform from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“reform” in British English

“reform” in American English

“reform” in Business English

More meanings of “reform”

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