reinvent Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “reinvent” in the English Dictionary

"reinvent" in British English

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reinventverb [T]

uk   us   /ˌriː.ɪnˈvent/
to ​produce something new that is ​based on something that already ​exists: The ​story of ​Romeo and Juliet was reinvented as a Los Angeles ​gangstermovie.reinvent yourself to ​changeyourjob and/or the way you ​look and ​behave so that you ​seem very different: He's one of those ​sportsmen who reinvent themselves as TV ​presenters.
(Definition of reinvent from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"reinvent" in American English

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reinventverb [T]

 us   /ˌri·ɪnˈvent/
to ​change someone or something so much that the ​person or thing ​seemscompletely new: He ​promised to reinvent ​government if ​elected.
(Definition of reinvent from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"reinvent" in Business English

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reinventverb [T]

uk   us   /ˌriːɪnˈvent/
to ​change something in a basic way so that it ​works differently: It's all about reinventing the way we do ​business. They must face reality and reinvent their ​failingsystems.
reinvent yourself to ​change the way you ​behave or ​look so that ​peoplethink of you differently: In ​marketing parlance, the ​company has reinvented itself with a new ​brand. After going ​bankrupt she reinvented herself as an artist.
reinvent the wheel to ​wastetime and ​money in ​developing something that already exists: I'm afraid we've ​wasted six ​years reinventing the wheel.
(Definition of reinvent from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“reinvent” in Business English

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